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We waited 1 year for this?

OP BigWinkyy69

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KayMrt wrote:
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
During the trailer it said how more would be talked about it (I think, today). The focus on that Sunday E3 briefing was on all of the things happening at Xbox, not just Halo.
But Halo is Xbox. When you have everyone's attention, you go big or go clever (like last year's trailer). But to then come back the next day and say "wait, there's more", well, you've misssed your chance. Any more info is great for the dedicated fans, but it's less likely to reach the larger audience, which is what Halo needs.
KayMrt wrote:
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
During the trailer it said how more would be talked about it (I think, today). The focus on that Sunday E3 briefing was on all of the things happening at Xbox, not just Halo.
But Halo is Xbox. When you have everyone's attention, you go big or go clever (like last year's trailer). But to then come back the next day and say "wait, there's more", well, you've misssed your chance. Any more info is great for the dedicated fans, but it's less likely to reach the larger audience, which is what Halo needs.
Why ramp up the hype a year and a half out? Why not wait until E3 2020 to really show off the new hardware in the new Xbox, the new Halo engine and the new Halo? Then, right after E3, you start opening some beta flights and testing out the game until about a month or two away from release, slowly teasing more information through a marketing campaign (because, yes, Halo is Xbox and the new Xbox depends on Halo's success). This is a sustainable hype. They can't do that for 18 months.
I'm just gonna do other things in life until its release.
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
There is still another E3 and other expos between now and release so we'll get that stuff next June.

Chill man, it's coming along nicely.
Yeah I was really hoping for more but I don't want them to show anything they're not ready to.
Exactly. Patience is a virtue. As Snickerdoodle and the various guests of 343's Halo Social Stream always say, "It's ready when it's ready."
Yeah I was really hoping for more but I don't want them to show anything they're not ready to.
Exactly. Patience is a virtue. As Snickerdoodle and the various guests of 343's Halo Social Stream always say, "It's ready when it's ready."
It's ready when it's ready but I hope it's ready by their release window haha
Yeah I was really hoping for more but I don't want them to show anything they're not ready to.
Exactly. Patience is a virtue. As Snickerdoodle and the various guests of 343's Halo Social Stream always say, "It's ready when it's ready."
It's ready when it's ready but I hope it's ready by their release window haha
I have no doubt that it will be. Gotta be optimistic!
Can we all agree that Halo 4's marketing really set the standards high- But ultimately resulted in criticism.

Even though they were mostly honest in their marketing.

Halo 5 was a complete misdirection and thus, of course, fans were absolutely disappointed by the fact that hunt the truth had nothing to do with the story.

It's better to show very little of the game but have a basic concept than to explain the plot or mislead the consumers.

It's going back to the Halo 2- 3 marketing. Despite the trailers depicting scenarios that either didn't occur as a mission (Starry Night) or was a little bit inaccurate (Halo 2-3 e3 reveal), it was pushing a meaning behind the trailers "Save Earth" "Finish the fight" and it was a success. Fans didn't know what to expect since there was little information about the plot but the slogan was more or less what we wanted to experience.
Guys, they’ve spent the last couple of years building the slipspace engine and planning the direction for the campaign and multiplayer. It’s a year and a half away from being “completed-” I don’t know why any of you were expecting much else. If they actually had a working build that was far along enough to show a gameplay demo, it would be coming out this fall, not next year.

A story trailer and some details on the direction of the game is all that is feasible right now. You’re not seeing gameplay yet because it’s simply too early

Many of you don’t seem to understand the timeline here. Obviously I’m not a developer, and I’m not even versed with coding, so I don’t know how accurate this is, but the past, present, and future of this dev cycle is probably like this:

2017 - 2018
-Building Slipspace Engine
-Planning gameplay, writing campaign, making big focus-oriented decisions, etc.

2018 - E3 2019
- Finishing slipspace engine, building the foundation for the game, more decision making and designing

Post E3 2019 - Q1 2020
- Implementing the majority of the actual game, including drawing environments, coding all of the mechanics, developing the campaign, building multiplayer maps, etc
- Early beta tests begin

Q2 2020 - Q3 2020 (Including E3)
-Optimizing performance (ie resolution and frame rate), configuring the online, finalizing the UI, bug-testing, and just adding more detail to everything
-More complex beta tests

Q4 2020 - Release
- Finishing any open items, continued bug testing, preparing the online, marketing, etc
This is what got 343 in trouble in the first place, their deceptive marketing campaigns and false advertisements. Personally any hype that we have for this game should be put in check until we see more.
Woaaaahhh hold up! First your saying we're barely getting any info from the trailers then say they are being deceptive with advertising like the last game which showed a bunch of misleading 'info'! So which is it?! The thing is, even IF your are right about the very little info we are being given being misleading, the game isn't even out yet so we don't actually know that to be true and I don't think its right to make that callout because of this.
As for hype, yes, we should all hype responsibly.
Also, some of use just need to be patient and be glad with what little information we're getting as we could very well be getting NO info with the game still not coming till a little over a year.
but the beta is going to be out in like 7-8 months
What makes you think we're getting a beta in 7-8 months? I wouldn't be surprised if we won't see anything new until e3 2020...
Because they need to have time to improve the game from the bugs the beta is going to have. And they should not have the beta 1 month before the game comes out.
Well ther eis a big difference "should" an "will"...
At this point I'm pretty sure they will double down on HI being the big selling point for the next Xbox with the XBO version just being the "ugly stepchild". They will probably not show the game running on a low setting (XBO) so they will probably wait for the full reveal of the next Xbox during the next e3.
If we're luckey, they will have a beta next summer, looking at how very little game studios like to show their work-in-progress games these days, I kinda expect them to only do some very short term testing 1-2 months before release
Yes I'm disappointed and wish I could have seen some gameplay or had a little taste of what the story would be like but on the flip side I want 343 to take their time and I'm perfectly fine with waiting for a good Halo game.
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
During the trailer it said how more would be talked about it (I think, today). The focus on that Sunday E3 briefing was on all of the things happening at Xbox, not just Halo.
But Halo is Xbox. When you have everyone's attention, you go big or go clever (like last year's trailer). But to then come back the next day and say "wait, there's more", well, you've misssed your chance. Any more info is great for the dedicated fans, but it's less likely to reach the larger audience, which is what Halo needs.
Why ramp up the hype a year and a half out? Why not wait until E3 2020 to really show off the new hardware in the new Xbox, the new Halo engine and the new Halo? Then, right after E3, you start opening some beta flights and testing out the game until about a month or two away from release, slowly teasing more information through a marketing campaign (because, yes, Halo is Xbox and the new Xbox depends on Halo's success). This is a sustainable hype. They can't do that for 18 months.
I didn't say they should really show off the hardware this year, and have an 18-month ad campaign. There's a middle ground between all-out and nothing at all. The trailer yesterday wasn't that middle ground.
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
During the trailer it said how more would be talked about it (I think, today). The focus on that Sunday E3 briefing was on all of the things happening at Xbox, not just Halo.
But Halo is Xbox. When you have everyone's attention, you go big or go clever (like last year's trailer). But to then come back the next day and say "wait, there's more", well, you've misssed your chance. Any more info is great for the dedicated fans, but it's less likely to reach the larger audience, which is what Halo needs.
Why ramp up the hype a year and a half out? Why not wait until E3 2020 to really show off the new hardware in the new Xbox, the new Halo engine and the new Halo? Then, right after E3, you start opening some beta flights and testing out the game until about a month or two away from release, slowly teasing more information through a marketing campaign (because, yes, Halo is Xbox and the new Xbox depends on Halo's success). This is a sustainable hype. They can't do that for 18 months.
I didn't say they should really show off the hardware this year, and have an 18-month ad campaign. There's a middle ground between all-out and nothing at all. The trailer yesterday wasn't that middle ground.
The game isn't ready and there's nothing to show off at this point. Maybe the correct move was have the 2018 E3 trailer/announcement this year (in conjunction with what we saw this year), because it would let less people down. That being said, Halo 5 was so long ago they needed to address the future somehow in 2018, so I have no problem showing off the engine last year and say "hey, we're working on it but it's a ways away, here's conceptually what it looks like" and then this year say "hey, we are taking our time, but here's some hints to the story".

Better to be slow and correct than rush a bad game out. So there is no middle ground at all to manage expectations with what fans want. They show what they're ready to show.
By not giving too much information, they avoid potentially being deceptive or false. This trailer sets the stage for the tone of the game, but beyond that, doesn't tell us anything about the game. Therefore there is nothing for players to latch onto as an expectation, like there was with H5's Hunt The Truth campaign. Giving away too much info before the game launches has backfired in the past, so it makes sense for 343 not to do that again. Not because they want to deceive players, but because players can take the info they give out the wrong way and build assumptions that were never intended.
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
During the trailer it said how more would be talked about it (I think, today). The focus on that Sunday E3 briefing was on all of the things happening at Xbox, not just Halo.
But Halo is Xbox. When you have everyone's attention, you go big or go clever (like last year's trailer). But to then come back the next day and say "wait, there's more", well, you've misssed your chance. Any more info is great for the dedicated fans, but it's less likely to reach the larger audience, which is what Halo needs.
Why ramp up the hype a year and a half out? Why not wait until E3 2020 to really show off the new hardware in the new Xbox, the new Halo engine and the new Halo? Then, right after E3, you start opening some beta flights and testing out the game until about a month or two away from release, slowly teasing more information through a marketing campaign (because, yes, Halo is Xbox and the new Xbox depends on Halo's success). This is a sustainable hype. They can't do that for 18 months.
I didn't say they should really show off the hardware this year, and have an 18-month ad campaign. There's a middle ground between all-out and nothing at all. The trailer yesterday wasn't that middle ground.
The game isn't ready and there's nothing to show off at this point. Maybe the correct move was have the 2018 E3 trailer/announcement this year (in conjunction with what we saw this year), because it would let less people down. That being said, Halo 5 was so long ago they needed to address the future somehow in 2018, so I have no problem showing off the engine last year and say "hey, we're working on it but it's a ways away, here's conceptually what it looks like" and then this year say "hey, we are taking our time, but here's some hints to the story".

Better to be slow and correct than rush a bad game out. So there is no middle ground at all to manage expectations with what fans want. They show what they're ready to show.
I haven't implied I want them to rush the game. You're putting words into my mouth now.

I just thought it'd been better if someone had come onstage and spoke a bit about the game. That wasn't a crazy expectation.
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
During the trailer it said how more would be talked about it (I think, today). The focus on that Sunday E3 briefing was on all of the things happening at Xbox, not just Halo.
But Halo is Xbox. When you have everyone's attention, you go big or go clever (like last year's trailer). But to then come back the next day and say "wait, there's more", well, you've misssed your chance. Any more info is great for the dedicated fans, but it's less likely to reach the larger audience, which is what Halo needs.
Why ramp up the hype a year and a half out? Why not wait until E3 2020 to really show off the new hardware in the new Xbox, the new Halo engine and the new Halo? Then, right after E3, you start opening some beta flights and testing out the game until about a month or two away from release, slowly teasing more information through a marketing campaign (because, yes, Halo is Xbox and the new Xbox depends on Halo's success). This is a sustainable hype. They can't do that for 18 months.
I didn't say they should really show off the hardware this year, and have an 18-month ad campaign. There's a middle ground between all-out and nothing at all. The trailer yesterday wasn't that middle ground.
The game isn't ready and there's nothing to show off at this point. Maybe the correct move was have the 2018 E3 trailer/announcement this year (in conjunction with what we saw this year), because it would let less people down. That being said, Halo 5 was so long ago they needed to address the future somehow in 2018, so I have no problem showing off the engine last year and say "hey, we're working on it but it's a ways away, here's conceptually what it looks like" and then this year say "hey, we are taking our time, but here's some hints to the story".

Better to be slow and correct than rush a bad game out. So there is no middle ground at all to manage expectations with what fans want. They show what they're ready to show.
I haven't implied I want them to rush the game. You're putting words into my mouth now.

I just thought it'd been better if someone had come onstage and spoke a bit about the game. That wasn't a crazy expectation.
So the post on Halo Waypoint they put up you just wanted someone on stage to say instead of posting about it online? I'm sincerely not trying to put words in your mouth and I'm sorry if I'm either misinterpreting you or you're misinterpreting me.
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
During the trailer it said how more would be talked about it (I think, today). The focus on that Sunday E3 briefing was on all of the things happening at Xbox, not just Halo.
But Halo is Xbox. When you have everyone's attention, you go big or go clever (like last year's trailer). But to then come back the next day and say "wait, there's more", well, you've misssed your chance. Any more info is great for the dedicated fans, but it's less likely to reach the larger audience, which is what Halo needs.
Why ramp up the hype a year and a half out? Why not wait until E3 2020 to really show off the new hardware in the new Xbox, the new Halo engine and the new Halo? Then, right after E3, you start opening some beta flights and testing out the game until about a month or two away from release, slowly teasing more information through a marketing campaign (because, yes, Halo is Xbox and the new Xbox depends on Halo's success). This is a sustainable hype. They can't do that for 18 months.
I didn't say they should really show off the hardware this year, and have an 18-month ad campaign. There's a middle ground between all-out and nothing at all. The trailer yesterday wasn't that middle ground.
The game isn't ready and there's nothing to show off at this point. Maybe the correct move was have the 2018 E3 trailer/announcement this year (in conjunction with what we saw this year), because it would let less people down. That being said, Halo 5 was so long ago they needed to address the future somehow in 2018, so I have no problem showing off the engine last year and say "hey, we're working on it but it's a ways away, here's conceptually what it looks like" and then this year say "hey, we are taking our time, but here's some hints to the story".

Better to be slow and correct than rush a bad game out. So there is no middle ground at all to manage expectations with what fans want. They show what they're ready to show.
I haven't implied I want them to rush the game. You're putting words into my mouth now.

I just thought it'd been better if someone had come onstage and spoke a bit about the game. That wasn't a crazy expectation.
So the post on Halo Waypoint they put up you just wanted someone on stage to say instead of posting about it online? I'm sincerely not trying to put words in your mouth and I'm sorry if I'm either misinterpreting you or you're misinterpreting me.
Essentially, yes. A lot of Halo fans don't use Waypoint, nevermind most gamers.

I just wanted Halo: Infinite to be THE game of E3, and I don't think the trailer alone was enough.
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
During the trailer it said how more would be talked about it (I think, today). The focus on that Sunday E3 briefing was on all of the things happening at Xbox, not just Halo.
But Halo is Xbox. When you have everyone's attention, you go big or go clever (like last year's trailer). But to then come back the next day and say "wait, there's more", well, you've misssed your chance. Any more info is great for the dedicated fans, but it's less likely to reach the larger audience, which is what Halo needs.
Why ramp up the hype a year and a half out? Why not wait until E3 2020 to really show off the new hardware in the new Xbox, the new Halo engine and the new Halo? Then, right after E3, you start opening some beta flights and testing out the game until about a month or two away from release, slowly teasing more information through a marketing campaign (because, yes, Halo is Xbox and the new Xbox depends on Halo's success). This is a sustainable hype. They can't do that for 18 months.
I didn't say they should really show off the hardware this year, and have an 18-month ad campaign. There's a middle ground between all-out and nothing at all. The trailer yesterday wasn't that middle ground.
The game isn't ready and there's nothing to show off at this point. Maybe the correct move was have the 2018 E3 trailer/announcement this year (in conjunction with what we saw this year), because it would let less people down. That being said, Halo 5 was so long ago they needed to address the future somehow in 2018, so I have no problem showing off the engine last year and say "hey, we're working on it but it's a ways away, here's conceptually what it looks like" and then this year say "hey, we are taking our time, but here's some hints to the story".

Better to be slow and correct than rush a bad game out. So there is no middle ground at all to manage expectations with what fans want. They show what they're ready to show.
I haven't implied I want them to rush the game. You're putting words into my mouth now.

I just thought it'd been better if someone had come onstage and spoke a bit about the game. That wasn't a crazy expectation.
So the post on Halo Waypoint they put up you just wanted someone on stage to say instead of posting about it online? I'm sincerely not trying to put words in your mouth and I'm sorry if I'm either misinterpreting you or you're misinterpreting me.
Essentially, yes. A lot of Halo fans don't use Waypoint, nevermind most gamers.

I just wanted Halo: Infinite to be THE game of E3, and I don't think the trailer alone was enough.
If it is any reconciliation, it's the game of the next xbox and will define whether it's a success or not. Based on that, I'd bet you'll be happy at E3 2020.
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
KayMrt wrote:
It needed someone to come onstage and talk about the game a bit, or show a trailer of the work behind the scenes, with some environments and vistas in there. It didn't build on last year's trailer, which was a missed opportunity.
During the trailer it said how more would be talked about it (I think, today). The focus on that Sunday E3 briefing was on all of the things happening at Xbox, not just Halo.
But Halo is Xbox. When you have everyone's attention, you go big or go clever (like last year's trailer). But to then come back the next day and say "wait, there's more", well, you've misssed your chance. Any more info is great for the dedicated fans, but it's less likely to reach the larger audience, which is what Halo needs.
Why ramp up the hype a year and a half out? Why not wait until E3 2020 to really show off the new hardware in the new Xbox, the new Halo engine and the new Halo? Then, right after E3, you start opening some beta flights and testing out the game until about a month or two away from release, slowly teasing more information through a marketing campaign (because, yes, Halo is Xbox and the new Xbox depends on Halo's success). This is a sustainable hype. They can't do that for 18 months.
I didn't say they should really show off the hardware this year, and have an 18-month ad campaign. There's a middle ground between all-out and nothing at all. The trailer yesterday wasn't that middle ground.
The game isn't ready and there's nothing to show off at this point. Maybe the correct move was have the 2018 E3 trailer/announcement this year (in conjunction with what we saw this year), because it would let less people down. That being said, Halo 5 was so long ago they needed to address the future somehow in 2018, so I have no problem showing off the engine last year and say "hey, we're working on it but it's a ways away, here's conceptually what it looks like" and then this year say "hey, we are taking our time, but here's some hints to the story".

Better to be slow and correct than rush a bad game out. So there is no middle ground at all to manage expectations with what fans want. They show what they're ready to show.
I haven't implied I want them to rush the game. You're putting words into my mouth now.

I just thought it'd been better if someone had come onstage and spoke a bit about the game. That wasn't a crazy expectation.
So the post on Halo Waypoint they put up you just wanted someone on stage to say instead of posting about it online? I'm sincerely not trying to put words in your mouth and I'm sorry if I'm either misinterpreting you or you're misinterpreting me.
Essentially, yes. A lot of Halo fans don't use Waypoint, nevermind most gamers.

I just wanted Halo: Infinite to be THE game of E3, and I don't think the trailer alone was enough.
If it is any reconciliation, it's the game of the next xbox and will define whether it's a success or not. Based on that, I'd bet you'll be happy at E3 2020.
That does seem to be the case, as it was with Halo CE. We'll just have to wait and see.
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