Forums / Games / Halo 5: Guardians

Aim still broken

OP Bushjdo

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sensitivity: 2
Look Acceleration: 4
0% inner
0% outter
I'd argue you're just bad. Go play COD.
Elite controller: Stick profile - Smooth
Look Sensitivity - 3
Look Acceleration - 5
Dead Zones - 0% - 0%
I know you said that you messed with the new controller settings, but if you did the way you were suppose to then you wouldn't be complaining. Start each of them at 0, mess around, and then go up one. Do that for both the deadzone options and you will eventually fix your problems, if you are having a hard time aiming that isnt the system, literally, get gud m8
I adjusted each settings, the proper way. I'm not the only one who still have issues.
RollCats wrote:
git gud
Did you just tried to do the same joke twice?
The controller settings, although a welcome addition, do not address core issues with the aiming mechanics.

The precision aiming zone still functions the same. When your reticle is near a target, there is an across the board sensitivity drop. This is supposed to help with preventing over-aiming, but it creates ample amounts of under-aim. The reticle becomes sluggish, heavy, and unresponsive. Subtle-to-normal levels of aiming input should NOT be diminished until the reticle is actually on target.

The massive acceleration jump still exists. Yes, being able to adjust the time-based acceleration is a nice-to-have addition. Nonetheless, the velocity jump from aiming-mode to turning-mode still occurs. The reticle lurches from a predictable speed, bypasses all the intermediary turning speeds, and just leaps into the maximum turning speed. It makes absolutely no sense whatsoever to just leap the reticle passed all the other turning speeds.

When you combine the precision aiming zone with the massive velocity jump from the turning mode, the game effectively compresses most of the quality aiming into a tiny narrow band of joystick angles. Precision aiming zone requires that you ramp up your input in order to move the reticle, but don't do it too much, because you might cross the turning mode threshold and lurch the reticle. These mechanics bring absolutely no value to the process of aiming.

The aiming mechanics have successfully produced a constant state of under-aim then over-aim. The reticle goes from a unresponsive slug to lurching forward. It is completely unintuitive and unpredictable and does nothing to help foster the growth of muscle memory. And then, on top of all that, even if you can overcome the horrific aiming mechanics, even if you can successfully line up shots, you quickly realize that bullet magnetism removes most of the value of actually aiming well. Halo 5 is the only FPS I have ever played where I scream at the game for kills that I got. Getting a kill in a situation where I clearly should have missed is gut wrenching. So the core intrinsic value of aiming well has been removed and has made the fundamental point-and-shoot game play completely unrewarding.

In Halo 5, you fight the aiming mechanics in order to unintuitively slosh the reticle near a target, and bullet magnetism takes care of the rest of the aiming. Yep, just wonderful.
DcIhNaGv3z wrote:
The controller settings, although a welcome addition, do not address core issues with the aiming mechanics.

The precision aiming zone still functions the same. When your reticle is near a target, there is an across the board sensitivity drop. This is supposed to help with preventing over-aiming, but it creates ample amounts of under-aim. The reticle becomes sluggish, heavy, and unresponsive. Subtle-to-normal levels of aiming input should NOT be diminished until the reticle is actually on target.

The massive acceleration jump still exists. Yes, being able to adjust the time-based acceleration is a nice-to-have addition. Nonetheless, the velocity jump from aiming-mode to turning-mode still occurs. The reticle lurches from a predictable speed, bypasses all the intermediary turning speeds, and just leaps into the maximum turning speed. It makes absolutely no sense whatsoever to just leap the reticle passed all the other turning speeds.

When you combine the precision aiming zone with the massive velocity jump from the turning mode, the game effectively compresses most of the quality aiming into a tiny narrow band of joystick angles. Precision aiming zone requires that you ramp up your input in order to move the reticle, but don't do it too much, because you might cross the turning mode threshold and lurch the reticle. These mechanics bring absolutely no value to the process of aiming.

The aiming mechanics have successfully produced a constant state of under-aim then over-aim. The reticle goes from a unresponsive slug to lurching forward. It is completely unintuitive and unpredictable and does nothing to help foster the growth of muscle memory. And then, on top of all that, even if you can overcome the horrific aiming mechanics, even if you can successfully line up shots, you quickly realize that bullet magnetism removes most of the value of actually aiming well. Halo 5 is the only FPS I have ever played where I scream at the game for kills that I got. Getting a kill in a situation where I clearly should have missed is gut wrenching. So the core intrinsic value of aiming well has been removed and has made the fundamental point-and-shoot game play completely unrewarding.

In Halo 5, you fight the aiming mechanics in order to unintuitively slosh the reticle near a target, and bullet magnetism takes care of the rest of the aiming. Yep, just wonderful.
Couldn't have said it better.
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