Skip to main content

Forums / Games / Halo 5: Guardians

My Overall Halo 5 Campaign Thoughts and Criticism

OP I DR HALSEY I

  1. 1
  2. ...
  3. ...
  4. 2
I've stated my opinion on Halo 5's campaign story across various forum posts, but never a comprehensive one where I outline my thoughts on the whole thing. So, here it goes.

Starting with the Halsey introduction cutscene, the story seemed to be heading towards a direction that it never went. I could not know that at the time, but when Halsey mentions ONI in relation to Spartan Locke and how they'll kill both her and Locke, I had assumed the disparate elements of the ONI plot points from Hunt the Truth and several expanded universe media sources would come together in this game. ONI was responsible for the creation of the Spartan-IIs, and Master Chief. ONI was once the employer of Jameson Locke. ONI was partly responsible for the unstable situation on Sanghelios and helped fund some of the Arbiter's enemies. ONI undertook a massive misinformation campaign that took care of detractors like Benjamin Giraud and Petra Janecek and possibly covered their butts for Chief maybe going rogue. But yet these elements, and ONI as an entity, are largely absent from Halo 5, so immediately the build up about ONI for the last three years has been largely for nothing. That should have been a bad sign yet I could not know it at the time and so the introductory cutscene with Halsey ended up being relatively pointless.

Moving towards Mission 1: Osiris, again there is a disconnect with Halo 5 and the rest of the Halo fiction. The main plot point here is simple enough, colonies are being decimated by something Forerunner in origin. Yet Osiris is tasked to retrieve Dr. Halsey from the hands of Jul 'Mdama. This is a bit of a problem since Halo 4's Spartan Ops ended with Halsey and Jul having one-half of the Janus Key, a Forerunner artifact that has the location of all Forerunner technology in the galaxy, and the UNSC with the other and a location known as the Absolute Record looming in the background as a next place of significance in the Halo story. None of that is references or relevant to Halo 5 and its continuation in Halo: Escalation amounted to little more than a reversion to the status quo for the UNSC and Jul 'Mdama. Moving past that, I actually didn't mind the showy nature of Osiris departing from the Pelican and fighting through the warring Covenant and Promethean factions. They are normal humans who have received the next best thing to super-powers, yet they don't act like kids or anything. They use their abilities to make it past a dangerous fray with style and I don't think the scene was made too easy for Osiris. I have to give 343 credit for remembering to give the Covenant energy shields this time around rather than making the Covenant one hit kills like in Spartan Ops' cutscene. For the most part, I had very few problems with the way the story was told in this mission, but they could have done better to explain why the Prometheans suddenly turned on Jul. I can assume the Warden Eternal or Cortana assumed control, but this is probably where the Janus Key or Absolute Record could have been tied in. Cortana could have taken control of both and tipped off Halsey to her presence and thus give Halsey a reason to contact the UNSC about her. Further, I was dismayed to see Jul 'Mdama so flippantly killed off. That character was given so much build up over the years and was a breath of fresh air to the typical Covenant religious zealots of old given he was effectively a Forerunner "atheist" using false religious fervor to restart the Covenant in order to protect his species from meddling humans...of which ONI just happened to end up being for him. His death was just to make Osiris look good and it saddens me to think another religious nut, Sali 'Nyon, from Escalation will end up the face of the Covenant after him. The first mission really underlines a major problem with Halo 5 being disconnected from the wider story and thus sacrificing better narratives for ultimately a weaker one that comes out of nowhere.

With Mission 2: Blue Team, my hopes got a bit brighter. I enjoyed the brief talk between Fred and Kelly about Chief's mental status and I'm happy Fred, my favorite Spartan, seemed to be a voice of reason, but sadly that is really the only time he is. Still, their action sequence was amazing and a good contrast with the flash of Osiris'. They come in hot and are able to clear enemies from an area without firing a single shot at them. Badass. The fact this mission took place on an ONI research ship that the Intel suggests was working on a deadly pathogen that affected humans still made me think ONI might have a bigger role than they did, but alas it was more misdirection. The mission itself reminded me a lot of Pillar of Autumn and Forward Unto Dawn from Halo: CE and Halo 4. Towards the end we see Chief getting a vision of Cortana and this remains one of the odder moments of the game since it isn't clear how he gets that mission. There is precedent with the Halo 3 Cortana Moments, but those were minor hallucinations and at least the audio was the Gravemind hacking Chief's systems from what I have read. Perhaps Chief was able to access the Domain itself, but I don't see how a konk on the head would allow him to access it when the books explained now humans had ever done so. It is essentially just a contextless scene that reveals Cortana is back and undermines all the production talk from 343 before the game released about Halo 5 dealing with Chief moving past Cortana's death. I do like the nod to Kelly's impulsiveness by making her the first to board the prowler first, but other than that Blue Team seems all to willing to just follow along with Chief's choice. I guess it speaks to how close a bond Blue Team has with Chief, but something just seems off to me. To quote Chief, "I don't like it."

The confrontation between Halsey, Plamer, Lasky and Roland afterwards had interesting undertones. Roland had been responsible for creating a fake trial along with the ONI AI Black-Box to put a rampant AI named Iona into stasis after she petitioned for a trial to prevent her rampancy. It weighed on him and definitely affected his outlook and explains why he seemed to hostile to Halsey for throwing Cortana under the bus, at least it seemed like she was doing that. Still, out of all the Halo media released prior to Halo 5 it is odd how Frank O'Connor's short story is essentially the only one that mattered. Moving on, the dialogue between Locke and Buck I think helped to show how much of a strategist Locke really is. His choice to go with an armor restraint shows that he knows that he and Osiris can't beat Blue Team in a straight-up fight, so he goes for a different approach. I also don't think Locke's willingness to see Chief as another target is an insult towards Chief because as his later statement implying Chief inspired him to be a Spartan shows he respects him. Locke was one of the bright spots of Halo 5 to me and shows that Lead Writer Brian Reed can write good characters when he isn't shooting for either generic villains (of whom we will see later) or making characters who hate Halsey.

To Be Continued
Missions 3: Glassed, 4: Meridian Station, 5: Unconfirmed and 6: Evacuation all take place on Meridian and I think are fairly solid for the most part. Outer Colony politics and the insurrection have always been in the background of Halo and the closest we got to it was the militiamen in Halo: Reach. While the Prometheans were the major threat, I liked the tension these Outer Colonists had with Fireteam Osiris. I think Tanaka’s status as a Outer Colonist helped shed some light on this part of the Halo story for newcomers fairly well as she broke down certain events. The fact that a glassed world was being used by a corporation to essentially make itself the owners of the world as they scrape the glass was also really chilling and reminded me of a Hunt the Truth article about how the minerals from the glassed worlds like Meridian were being used for products. Scary stuff. I also got a kick out of the other Spartans being surprised by all the heavy firepower on a frontier world, especially when they got that Scorpion tank. It really hammered home how much those people valued their independence. What really surprised me was that Governor Sloan was an AI running the whole show and how that dynamic worked. I thought he was a real person for the longest time and I was impressed again by Locke’s awareness of the situation by treating Sloan as if he were a person. Meridian Station was an interesting further look at colonial life that I am glad was finally in the games for a change.

Still, by the time we get to the actual Guardian things begin to breakdown for this portion of the story. We are introduced to the Warden Eternal and for the life of me I can’t think of what this character’s purpose is besides being a glorified boss fight. Needless to say his first introduction left much to be desired. All we get is that he serves Cortana because...reasons and don’t much like Osiris. Swell. The confrontation between Locke and Chief that follows was really poorly done too. I don’t get why Osiris just watched Locke and Chief fight and not help Locke out when they could have just leaped across from their platform to the one the two fought on. For such a highly hyped up moment from the advertising it fell short. The design of the Guardian’s face bugged me as well since we get a solid look at it, the thing just screams “Boo, I’m so menacing!” So much for subtlety. The last mission on Meridian does at least end fairly strong. Osiris has to get off the planet and we see Sloan scramble to get colonists off the planet. That scene where the woman trapped on the surface calling for help still haunts me.

Mission 7: Reunion is pretty bittersweet. I loved Genesis’ scenery and some of the interactions between Chief and Blue Team were golden, especially the one about Halsey cataloging everything there. I liked the nod to Oly Oly Oxen Free that Cortana plays to attract Chief’s attention to Forerunner consoles, but any enjoyment I got from that was taken away after the major retconning done to make Cortana’s death reversible. Chief mentions the Didact’s ship was pulled into slipspace, yet that never happened in Halo 4. This can be traced to the 343 account known as Catalog on Waypoint who provided canonical information for a while saying in July 2014 that a piece of it went into slipspace. This makes things a bit harder to believe given this means pieces of the Didact’s ship went to two different areas, Installation 03 (Halo: Escalation) and Genesis. It seems too convenient that Cortana just happened to survive the HAVOK nuke going off and just happened to be in the part of the ship that just happened to go into slipspace that just happened to find the Domain and just happened to find Genesis. I don’t know, I figure this mission was meant to be emotional since Chief and Cortana talk to each other again, but it just made me feel as if the Halo 4 ending was just rendered pointless. To me, Cortana in that ending helped save humanity, Earth and the Chief, helped kick the Didact’s -Yoink- and sacrificed her life to save Chief. Now? Apparently she just left for about a year, never said anything and now thinks she can be the ruler of the galaxy. I’m also upset they barely go into detail about what the Domain is. Characters call it Forerunner, it isn’t. I don’t even think they refer to it being alive and with its own motives once in the story.

Ironically, I loved the Sanghelios sections so much, ie Missions 8-12, yet don’t really have much to talk about with them. The environments were gorgeous, the ancient Sangheili ruins had an aura of mystery not yet felt for me since Halo 2’s ancient Forerunner ruins. It was just great to be on Sanghelios after reading about it and watching certain videos showing it. I’d have liked the sky to be redder, but it wasn’t something I focused on too much. Still, I wished the Arbiter had a more prominent role in Halo 5 and the Halo 2 Anniversary terminals with Locke and Arbiter don’t seem to connect much to what happens in Halo 5. What happened to the future being sowed in Chief’s past? Hell, Locke already knows why Chief’s motives are by the time he gets to Sanghelios, so those terminals make less sense now. I will say that Dimkee Hotay is a treasure and I’d love to see more of him. I dunno, a Grunt perspective on Halo stuff is just great and the Elite grunting back in reply is just hilarious.

To Be Continued
By the time I got to the final missions, 13-15, on Genesis I had begun to really lose interest in the story. Cortana’s turn to villainy felt uninspired and seemed like it was meant to generate shock value and not much else. Not to mention that the “AI/Robot Revolution” plotline with the Created has been done before and much better. Cortana makes it seem like humans and AIs were always at odds and while I know the relationship wasn’t perfect, I never got the impression that humans hated AIs as Cortana seems to imply. Even Frank O’Connor’s short story, Saint’s Testimony, dealing with this kind of conflict never got close to implying humans and AIs could never be equal. If anything it said that such an future can happen, but it will be a slow process. Cortana’s further claims that she will achieve peace for the galaxy also cheapens the actual signs of reconciliation going on in the galaxy. Halo: Last Light showed UNSC and insurrectionist hostilities continue to occur, but that common bonds could be mended with detective Veta Lopis, who had little love for the UNSC after learning about the S-IIIs, joining ONI to look after the S-IIIs she bonded with and help make things right with the galaxy after seeing her authorities become more militaristic and unreasonable. Hunters in the Dark showed humans and Elites working together to stop the Halos from firing due to a rampant Monitor on the Ark acting out revenge for the damage done to the Ark. Shadow of Intent showed Rtas ‘Vadum, the Shipmaster of Halo 3 and Spec Ops. Commander from Halo 2, coming to terms with his hatred of the San ‘Shyuum and admitting that they were not all evil and deserved mercy after helping one of their warriors come to terms with what a lying Minister told him. Broken Circle even had Sangheili rescue a San ‘Shyuum from High Charity and look after him because he believed they were being betrayed and wished to help them. Even the Kilo-5 books, as bad as they were, showed humans and Covenant species could work together on Venezia (they may have been outlaws, pirates and mercs but it’s a start). And what is Cortana’s authority? She never really says, she just makes vague promises of peace and I assume 343 assumed we’d just trust her because she is Cortana. Then she tries to kidnap Chief and force him in stasis for 10,000 years and starts smack talking to Osiris like a child (really Cortana saying Vale has daddy issues? OK). At that point, I lost sympathy with Cortana and her emotional “JOHN!” scream at the end didn’t even phase me. I was just glad the game was over.

So yeah, that boils down my thoughts on the story. May not be as in-depth as others may take it, but in a general sense that’s how I feel. I’m not really looking forward to Halo 6 if Cortana is still going to be the big bad nor do I feel the fiction in books and so on will be as strong as it was since Cortana’s actions will make any pre-Halo 5 stories meaningless or post-Halo 5 stories have to deal with her megalomania. But if you think of anything else to ask me, I’ll gladly answer if you want and feel free to share your thoughts. Be respectful though.
Woud've like to have seen you break this down (into separate posts, rather than sections in a single post) into more digestible bits, because you cover a lot of ground (very well, I may add) and I've always respected your views, but I'll scatter shot a few responses. From your first post:

- Overall, I was hoping for the more ONI-as-a-villain approach to Halo 5 as well, and wanted to see Jul's Covenant rise to be a more significant threat in Halo, so the story's general direction was disappointing. But, unlike Halo 2 (where the story went in a different direction that what we got), I liked it.
- Chief's vision of Cortana: possibly through the Domain after the Librarian's little acceleration in Halo 4?
- As a big Fred fan as well, I liked his part in Blue Team. The Chief concern was a definite Fred moment, and the "They can't court martial all of us," was funny and seemed like his way of dealing with something he didn't think was a good idea at all.
- I really enjoyed the Roland outburst during the Lasky/Palmer/Halsey discussion, for the reasons you outlined. Made it interesting to reconsider that moment at the end.

Quote:
This is a bit of a problem since Halo 4's Spartan Ops ended with Halsey and Jul having one-half of the Janus Key, a Forerunner artifact that has the location of all Forerunner technology in the galaxy, and the UNSC with the other and a location known as the Absolute Record looming in the background as a next place of significance in the Halo story. None of that is references or relevant to Halo 5 and its continuation in Halo: Escalation amounted to little more than a reversion to the status quo for the UNSC and Jul 'Mdama.
Note: Vale (I believe, maybe it was Tanaka) mentioned in passing towards the end of the mission that Forerunner artifacts have been discovered at a much faster rate recently. I think that's the nod to the Absolute Record. If the Absolute Record is the link to Halsey discovering the Cortana and Domain portion of the story, then I can see its value.
I can agree for the most part with your op, but I certainly didn't mind cortana being the antagonist for the story line, I just think it was executed very poorly. (like the rest of the story.)

Beating the campaign twice all I can say is "where did it go wrong?" I feel like someone finished it then ripped out important parts at the last minute or change there minds without filling anything to fill in the blanks. The way halo 5 campaign went makes me hesitate to get halo 6.
I feel like that too, like everything else were put aside just because cortana went "mad". Perhaps do that to make it easy for newcomers.
But I'm still confident in Halo 6.
I really enjoyed the campaign especially after the boring game play that Halo 4. H5 was a big increase in campaign game play and story since h3
I suppose my biggest problem with Halo 5's plot (speaking in a vacuum, which is to say ignoring the blatantly misleading information we were given) is that Cortana had never really expressed any desire to rule. It just seems like a plot point that came out of nowhere. The hell of it is that this would have been a fairy easy fix: make the warden responsible for summoning the guardians, cortana reveals that she's still alive and unites all known species in the galaxy to fight the threat, and the rest could work from there. If she'd had a taste of power and the idea that she could truly shape the galaxy for the better in the form of creating the first peace between all these creatures since first contact, it would make sense that she would want to assume the mantle of responsibility in a benevolent dictatorship.

I'm knocking off Helios, Durandal, and Commander Shepard, but it's not as though the currently existing plot didn't take some pretty heavy-handed inspiration from other sources.
I can agree for the most part with your op, but I certainly didn't mind cortana being the antagonist for the story line, I just think it was executed very poorly. (like the rest of the story.)

Beating the campaign twice all I can say is "where did it go wrong?" I feel like someone finished it then ripped out important parts at the last minute or change there minds without filling anything to fill in the blanks. The way halo 5 campaign went makes me hesitate to get halo 6.
Brian reed (the lead writer) I believe has some very bold and interesting ideas, but his execution of it all was VERY mediocre.. I mean I guess we shouldn't expect too much of him anyway given his background which is primarily comic books..I'm sorry but that is not the right kind of person to be handed the role of lead writer to.

The story overall is set up more than ever to be the biggest in series history (again) but i really don't believe it could live up to its full potential (again) if reed is the lead writer..I'm sure he's a great guy, he's just not a great Halo guy
Yeah, this is definitely the weakest story of the franchise. Cortana returning not only diminishes the ending of Halo 4 by rendering her sacrifice meaningless and destroying any potential character development for Chief, but it just feels like a giant "rear end" pull that only occurs for the sake of a twist. Her survival come out of no where and makes no sense. I might have been able to accept that she survived the destruction of the Mantles Approach, but that she just happened to fall into slip space, and find the Domain, even though it shouldn't exist anymore, and land on another super secret Forerunner world and get control of another, never mentioned before, super powerful Forerunner weapon goes beyond my ability to suspend my disbelief. Worse still was her complete change of character for no reason. In the gap between Hal 4 and 5 Cortana has gone from "die to protect her friends" to "kill millions without a thought and conquer the galaxy" and we are given no explanation whatsoever. Again, it just feels forced for the sake of twist. The Didact could have easily replaced Cortana's role in the story and it would have made infinitely more sense.

As for the plot itself, the "rise of the AI's" story just feels so out of place for Halo. Not once is it ever implied that AI's are oppressed or particularly unhappy with their place in the world, or that Humans hate them or treat them unfairly. This conflict comes out on nowhere. Even in the context of Halo 5 itself the conflict is confusing considering that the residents of Meridian clearly trusted and respected AI's by giving Sloan the leadership of the colony. Then he betrays them and everyone else just to stave off rampancy? It's not like its Humanities fault that AI's only live for 7 years, its just a fact of their creation. Being mad about it is like a kid being mad at his parents that he won't live forever. The fact that we got such an interesting advertising campaign narrative just rubs salt in the wound. There was so much potential for a narrative involving Chief discovering his humanity, ONI trying to frame him, and Locke truly trying to end Chief.

I was also not a fan of the focus on fire team Osiris over Blue team. I have nothing against playing as different characters. I personally loved playing as the Arbiter and would like to again. However, Osiris really doesn't bring anything to the table in terms of unique perspective or story progression. Locke and Chief are never in conflict, they have the same goals and the same motives right from the start, so why are we even playing as Osiris? Their entire "conflict" is contrived for the sake of having Osiris in the story. Really, why would you bench the only guy who might actually be able to stop Cortana (Chief) and when he goes to stop her anyway, you waste resources going after him rather than helping him stop the galactic dictator? Chief already went "rouge" in Halo 4 (where they didn't send anybody after him) and he turned out to be completely right, you would think they would trust him more. Focusing on Osiris ended up taking any impact or development away from Blue team, who most would much rather be playing as, and relegates them to damsels in distress by the end.

I could go one, but you get the gist. Its such a shame that a campaign with so much potential ended up falling so flat. The only part that I truly enjoyed were the missions on Sanghelios. It was the only time in the campaign that I felt there were real stakes at play and that felt like it fit in the Halo universe. Even that was somewhat tainted when you think about how interesting a final showdown between Jul' and Arbiter at the battle of Sunaion could have been.
As a gamer, the story plays second fiddle to the gameplay. The campaign was decent, but there is no campaign scoring, no par times, no campaign commendations and no earning req points for completing campaign missions. Not to mention some cut scenes you can't skip, I saw them once and I should never have to watch them again if I don't want to. Those missing elements bother me way more than the story itself. The only part of the story that I really didn't like was the fight between Locke and Chief it was like a "Michael Bay" moment, it was too over the top for me.

Nice breakdown but I honestly didn't read the whole thing.
343 need new writers for halo 6. H5 story was pathetic.
343 need new writers for halo 6. H5 story was pathetic.
I know right
I'm just going to follow and read this later because as of finding this post it's 12:46 A.M where I live and there's no way I'm reading all this at this time of night.
With all the points on how bad this Story is can we mention how all the characters don't shut up in the campaign with meaningless exposition?

Halo 4 did it fine with MC taking in some parts and that's it but in here they talk SO much it's ridiculous.

The problem with this is the lack of immersion in the game, in previous games you are the hero, you are no longer these characters in Halo 5 and that breaks immersion.
With all the points on how bad this Story is can we mention how all the characters don't shut up in the campaign with meaningless exposition?

Halo 4 did it fine with MC taking in some parts and that's it but in here they talk SO much it's ridiculous.

The problem with this is the lack of immersion in the game, in previous games you are the hero, you are no longer these characters in Halo 5 and that breaks immersion.
That meaningless exposition might be there, more likely than not, for the casual players who refuse to explore the lore in any capacity (because there are people who see that as meaningless)

As far as immersion goes? I think you might be misconstruing its meaning. If the game had a lack of immersion, they wouldn't have tried so hard to give the various squad members their own uniquely crafted visors, not to mention that the squad member you're playing as is voiced as if you're in that helmet, with the others on comms. (And everyone else in a co-op game having this effect uniquely tailored to their choice). Not to mention that 6 out of 8 of the squad members just didn't come out of thin air, and have had deeply rooted stories in the lore. (Though, maybe Tanaka and Vale have been around and I'm just not caught up.)

So explain to me how not being a singular hero character (even though these eight are protagonists in some form in the grand scheme of things) breaks immersion, especially in a IP that has consistently depicted Spartan Squads in the lore? (including Blue Team in quite a few books)
This post has been edited by a moderator. Please do not post inappropriate content.
*Original post. Click at your own discretion.
Spoiler:
Show
I'll be honest here. I think they were far too ambitious with the approach, and you're right, there was a disconnect not just with the larger universe but also the previous games. There wasn't much at all in the story to establish a sense of continuity other than just lots of famous Halo characters showing up. Blue Team was so woefully underused that I wound up being disappointed they were in the game. I was so looking forward to those Fall of Reach characters and they didn't show up, or barely at all.
I feel like Locke is horribly under-developed, I know way more about Buck, the comic relief than the actual team leader, and I also don't understand why they felt the need to try to get all of the lore crammed in through mostly dialogue/banter in-game. The cutscenes are flashy, but not much is revealed of anyone in any of them, and one important covenant character is killed entirely in a cutscene, that's just sloppy writing. The game felt like it was skipping around, trying to fit too much into too little space. The game didn't even feel like a sequel to Halo 4 at all. It felt like another reboot, the way 4 felt like a reboot from 3. But I mean at least 4 had a story that I could follow easily. I don't have the time to do all this homework that you've done on it, I mean I just play the games and occasionally read the books that interest me. But I more or less stopped at Glasslands in the novels because I honestly find all this Forerunner terminology to be a chore to decipher. I still only have a basic grasp of what is happening, and I mean I know the Didact will be back, but I think he should've made an appearance in 5 at least just so I could see something familiar. Nothing felt familiar! It was more like an odd, twisted deja-vu. I knew versions of these characters, once, in another life it seems. And the new characters? Forget it. All I know about Locke is that he survived Nightfall and that he's a dude.
I always look at the OP here as a level headed voice of reason here on the forums (plus she's a doctor :P ). I am still pissed how terrible the campaign was. I haven't even played through it a second time, not even for Legendary completion. There's just no desire to, no real fun section in the campaign, and the soundtrack was very forgettable. I'll be scrutinizing Halo 6's campaign advertising much more from now on because this one's was so misleading and misdirected that I feel the marketing should write the story instead since they showed better execution than the writer.

It seems Brian Reed is still on the payroll at 343. That's fine, just shift him elsewhere for the love of god. He's done enough damage, get another lead writer for Halo 6.
I think the thing that really upset me for the whole campaign was the fact that it was over hyped by false advertisement and was led down a path that I'm pretty sure Bungie is sitting there going "What in the world did they just make, and why is destroying what we created". The whole advertising campaign was based around Locke hunting down John to end with a one on one fight to the death and how each one of them can be seen as a traitor in the others eyes, not Cortana is back and has gone so rampant (even if she believes to have been fixed) that she believes that what she is doing is for the best of all sentient life and that she has these deep dark desires for John...ok in the Fall of Reach (the book not the crappy stop motion comic cartoon that gave SPARTAN-II's emotions and feely touchy crap and destroyed a great story) she liked how John was composed as a soldier and how strong he was and his luck she actually altered he code to where only he could be paired with her and this was because she knew how well they would work together as a team as well as how much Halsey liked him and knew she would not say no to the pairing. Also I just want to know what happened to all the SPARTAN-IV fire teams from SPARTAN OPS cause there is no way that Osiris should have been in higher standing than Majestic or Crimson seeing how they both were able to save Infinity from the gravity well of Requiem. I think I'm just a sore Halo fan in the respects of how far down hill I feel the franchise has fallen and its odd I just played Reach a few days ago and it felt and looked like a Halo game where this one just fails to capture the same feeling. Also side note they should have never added in the aim mechanic (that still kicks you out if you get hit) in to the game cause now its like playing every other shooter.
  1. 1
  2. ...
  3. ...
  4. 2