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What is the engine used in Halo 5: Guardians?

OP XxPolonhaxX

What is the graphics engine used in Halo 5: Guardians? I would like to know details, such as: Creation time, people involved, who developed? (Just out of curiosity)
i think the engine of halo 5 is an upgrade of halo 4 engine
You know the name?
It's based on Havok if I'm not mistaken.
It's based on Havok if I'm not mistaken.
We have a name, it's a start, thank you.
Dema343 wrote:
i think the engine of halo 5 is an upgrade of halo 4 engine
Its actually a brand new engine.
There is a name for the engine, i saw it months ago in a topic , but cant remember lol..
Canine252 wrote:
Dema343 wrote:
i think the engine of halo 5 is an upgrade of halo 4 engine
Its actually a brand new engine.
Didn't feel brand new to me. It did seem like a H4 engine modified.
0
I have nine Platinum packs... If we match in a game send me a quick message in game saying I see you or something (so I can verify we did match) and a friend request so I can gift you a pack. You don't have to keep me as a "friend" as I am a solo player.
Canine252 wrote:
Dema343 wrote:
i think the engine of halo 5 is an upgrade of halo 4 engine
Its actually a brand new engine.
False.

The Halo 5 engine is a modified H4 one. Which is a modified H3 engine. Which was a modified H2 engine. Which was a modified engine of the CE/Havok engine.

Halo Infinite will have the first actually new engine in the Halo series since CE.
Canine252 wrote:
Dema343 wrote:
i think the engine of halo 5 is an upgrade of halo 4 engine
Its actually a brand new engine.
False.

The Halo 5 engine is a modified H4 one. Which is a modified H3 engine. Which was a modified H2 engine. Which was a modified engine of the CE/Havok engine.

Halo Infinite will have the first actually new engine in the Halo series since CE.
Really? O.o
Canine252 wrote:
Dema343 wrote:
i think the engine of halo 5 is an upgrade of halo 4 engine
Its actually a brand new engine.
False.

The Halo 5 engine is a modified H4 one. Which is a modified H3 engine. Which was a modified H2 engine. Which was a modified engine of the CE/Havok engine.

Halo Infinite will have the first actually new engine in the Halo series since CE.
Really? O.o
Yea, during Halo 4's development cycle they showed a video of them using the Reach engine to try new weapons. They even said H4 was build off the 3/Reach engine.
Just pray that this new engine doesnt disappoint!
Did you know that the word : slipspace , is in the campaign a couple of times
Havok engine?
Just to clear away some confusion: the graphics engine of Halo 5 is not Havok. As far as it is known, the graphics engine is made by 343i and is not based on any commercially available engine.

When it comes to the role of Havok, it provides the physics engine for the game, and that's all. It does not provide graphics, it is not the whole game engine, it just does the physics. The Halo 5 engine is not "Havok", it is not based on Havok, it just has Havok Physics as a component, and the rest of it has nothing to do with Havok.

Also, regarding the origins of the Halo 5 engine, it is indeed based on the Halo 4 engine, which is based on the prior Halo engines, and so on. This fact doesn't really mean anything since it's completely normal for game engines to build off previous work, because there's no point re-inventing the wheel. Somebody has written completely useable code in the past, so rather than rewriting all of it yourself, you take that old code and make the modifications and additions you need. Indeed, you can make arbitrarily many modifications until the engine bears little resemblance to what you started with, which is what has happened to the Halo engine over the years.
The history of the Halo Engine also known as BLAM!:

1) It originally began life as the Quake Engine, the same engine that Call of Duty spun-off from. The Blam! Engine was derived from the Quake Engine.

2) During the development of Halo 2, Bungie initially tried to scratch build an engine, the Stencil Engine, which was used to build the infamous Halo 2 E3 demo. However, it proved to be too taxing on the original XBox hardware, and as a result Bungie opted to reuse the Blam! Engine, improving it to some extent.

3) They would repeat this process for Halo 3, upgrading the engines shaders and lighting engine.

4) The engine's lighting was upgraded slightly for Halo 3: ODST to show off all the lights in the environment as well as to provide more contrast with the dark spaces that would require the use of the VISR to see.

5) Halo: Reach saw the Blam! Engine essentially gutted and rebuilt, resulting in vastly upgraded visuals and capabilities compared to past entries which had seen more incremental upgrades.

6) While it didn't rebuild the engine, Halo 4 did upgrade it a bit more, pushing it so far that the Xbox 360 was struggling with the game.

7) When Halo 5: Guardians started development, 343 Industries came up with the idea of Warzone which would support 24 players instead of the previous 16 players. This, in addition to the new movement mechanics, required them to tear apart the engine and rebuild it just like what had been done during Reach's development.

All of the Halo games, until now and excluding the spin-offs, have been built on the Blam!/Halo Engine, which itself was built on the Quake Engine. However, all signs point to Halo Infinite's Slipspace Engine being a scratch-built engine. Scratch-building generally only happens when the developers come to the conclusion that something they want to do can't be done on the current engine, no matter how much they rebuild it. This can range from the engine not being able to render the new art style properly or as well as they would like, to facets of the gameplay that are just beyond the capabilities of the engine.

As an example of this, at the beginning of the seventh generation, Square Enix built the White Engine, which would later be renamed Crystal Tools. This engine was set to power three different games: Final Fantasy XIII(Linear Turn-Based RPG), Final Fantasy Versus XIII(Open World Action RPG), and Final Fantasy XIV Online(MMO). The engine was originally conceived to be modular and capable of supporting a wide variety of games, but after the flagship title, Final Fantasy XIII, ran into development troubles, the development of the engine was railroaded in favor of that games needs. This, in turn, sent Versus XIII and XIV Online into development hell as the engine was no longer capable of doing what they needed it to do, and no amount of tinkering with the engine could fix that. XIV Online ended up releasing in an extremely broken state because the engine was not designed with MMO's in mind and just could not handle it properly. An engine was then built from scratch to run the new version of the game and worked far better than the original ever could have. Versus XIII was rebranded as Final Fantasy XV and all existing assets were ported to a new proprietary engine, Ebony, which served as a middleground between Crystal Tools and Square's new Luminous Studio engine. Luminous Studio proved to be exactly what the game needed to get off the ground, and Square built it with adaptability in mind. Although, during the course of Final Fantasy XV's development, Kingdom Hearts III shifted from Luminous to Unreal Engine 4 due to Luminous Studio's unfinished state and the developers familiarity with Unreal Engine. By the time Luminous Studio was completed and Final Fantasy XV out the door, the vast majority of Square's teams had opted to use Unreal Engine 4 instead and thus the one engine they built that could do everything, is now really only being used by one of Square's developers, which just goes to show how building a proprietary engine from scratch doesn't always pay off, which is why most developers just iterate upon older engines. Cheaper, safer, and they're familiar with the engine already making development faster. Halo Infinite's Slipspace Engine is probably gonna have 343 Industries going through a lot of growing pains.
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The engine is called Blam! which since Halo 2 the Engine has been Blam!+Havok . Halo has ran on the exact same engine since the start don't listen to peoples nonsense about each game being its own engine.. naw upgrades here and there as is the case with each halo game does not make it an "New" engine each game. Halo Infinite will be the first Halo to actually use an new engine.
The history of the Halo Engine also known as BLAM!:

1) It originally began life as the Quake Engine, the same engine that Call of Duty spun-off from. The Blam! Engine was derived from the Quake Engine.

2) During the development of Halo 2, Bungie initially tried to scratch build an engine, the Stencil Engine, which was used to build the infamous Halo 2 E3 demo. However, it proved to be too taxing on the original XBox hardware, and as a result Bungie opted to reuse the Blam! Engine, improving it to some extent.

3) They would repeat this process for Halo 3, upgrading the engines shaders and lighting engine.

4) The engine's lighting was upgraded slightly for Halo 3: ODST to show off all the lights in the environment as well as to provide more contrast with the dark spaces that would require the use of the VISR to see.

5) Halo: Reach saw the Blam! Engine essentially gutted and rebuilt, resulting in vastly upgraded visuals and capabilities compared to past entries which had seen more incremental upgrades.

6) While it didn't rebuild the engine, Halo 4 did upgrade it a bit more, pushing it so far that the Xbox 360 was struggling with the game.

7) When Halo 5: Guardians started development, 343 Industries came up with the idea of Warzone which would support 24 players instead of the previous 16 players. This, in addition to the new movement mechanics, required them to tear apart the engine and rebuild it just like what had been done during Reach's development.

All of the Halo games, until now and excluding the spin-offs, have been built on the Blam!/Halo Engine, which itself was built on the Quake Engine. However, all signs point to Halo Infinite's Slipspace Engine being a scratch-built engine. Scratch-building generally only happens when the developers come to the conclusion that something they want to do can't be done on the current engine, no matter how much they rebuild it. This can range from the engine not being able to render the new art style properly or as well as they would like, to facets of the gameplay that are just beyond the capabilities of the engine.

As an example of this, at the beginning of the seventh generation, Square Enix built the White Engine, which would later be renamed Crystal Tools. This engine was set to power three different games: Final Fantasy XIII(Linear Turn-Based RPG), Final Fantasy Versus XIII(Open World Action RPG), and Final Fantasy XIV Online(MMO). The engine was originally conceived to be modular and capable of supporting a wide variety of games, but after the flagship title, Final Fantasy XIII, ran into development troubles, the development of the engine was railroaded in favor of that games needs. This, in turn, sent Versus XIII and XIV Online into development hell as the engine was no longer capable of doing what they needed it to do, and no amount of tinkering with the engine could fix that. XIV Online ended up releasing in an extremely broken state because the engine was not designed with MMO's in mind and just could not handle it properly. An engine was then built from scratch to run the new version of the game and worked far better than the original ever could have. Versus XIII was rebranded as Final Fantasy XV and all existing assets were ported to a new proprietary engine, Ebony, which served as a middleground between Crystal Tools and Square's new Luminous Studio engine. Luminous Studio proved to be exactly what the game needed to get off the ground, and Square built it with adaptability in mind. Although, during the course of Final Fantasy XV's development, Kingdom Hearts III shifted from Luminous to Unreal Engine 4 due to Luminous Studio's unfinished state and the developers familiarity with Unreal Engine. By the time Luminous Studio was completed and Final Fantasy XV out the door, the vast majority of Square's teams had opted to use Unreal Engine 4 instead and thus the one engine they built that could do everything, is now really only being used by one of Square's developers, which just goes to show how building a proprietary engine from scratch doesn't always pay off, which is why most developers just iterate upon older engines. Cheaper, safer, and they're familiar with the engine already making development faster. Halo Infinite's Slipspace Engine is probably gonna have 343 Industries going through a lot of growing pains.
Awesome text! Where did you get all this information?
1) It originally began life as the Quake Engine, the same engine that Call of Duty spun-off from. The Blam! Engine was derived from the Quake Engine.
I don't know where you got this, but this not true. The Halo engine is based on the engine from Bungie's previous franchise, Myth, as told by Jason Jones:
Quote:
Halo didn't begin as a strategy game but the engine it uses started out that way. The engine Halo uses began as a next-generation Myth terrain engine, with polygonal units.
And although the origins of the Myth engine are less clear, it appears that it was built from scratch. It's certainly not based on the Quake engine, since work on Myth began in January of 1996, predating the release of Quake in mid 1996 by half a year. The Halo engine has nothing to do with the Quake engine.