Forums / Games / Halo 4

Is Halo 4 Better on Xbox One S?

OP BoundlessHalo97

So I don't own an Xbox One, but a friend of mine does. On his fat model Xbox One we were attempting a Halo 4 Legendary coop playthrough, but every time we attempted to load up the mission Infinity (even weeks later) the game would simply freeze and crash which pushed us to move over to Halo: The Master Chief Collection and start over from scratch there. As I have an Xbox One S on the way and have little interest in Halo: The Master Chief Collection is there any impact at all on backwards compatible titles with that model? I know these games all run in software, but the slightly enhanced hardware should hold some benefit when running backwards compatible titles... right?
Besides HDR, the most I’ve heard the One S do better than the OG One (what a name, huh?) is provide 1-2 fps more for Xbox One games. For instance, Project Cars has an unlocked frame rate and it’s very inconsistent on OG One, bouncing around from like 30 all the way up (on rare occasions) 60 fps. The One S shows similar performance, but tests showed it was able to deliver a few more frames here and there. It’s nothing significant that is noticeable without testing equipment and analysis.

For a BC game like Halo 4 which, as far as I’m aware, does not push the Xbox One to its limits to run it optimally, the One S won’t run it any better. The crashes you guys experienced on that level were likely emulator issues that might have been ironed out in an update.

Speaking personally, I’ve played all the games on Xbox One at some point or another after they became backwards compatible and playing on Xbox One is far and away the best way to experience those games. The perfomace advantage and platform features make it a joy. While I understand your hesitation to buy MCC, I think you might have a change of heart if you spend a bit of time with it if you haven’t already. Save for the cool menus from the originals, it’s hard to play them after experiencing MCC.
So I don't own an Xbox One, but a friend of mine does. On his fat model Xbox One we were attempting a Halo 4 Legendary coop playthrough, but every time we attempted to load up the mission Infinity (even weeks later) the game would simply freeze and crash which pushed us to move over to Halo: The Master Chief Collection and start over from scratch there. As I have an Xbox One S on the way and have little interest in Halo: The Master Chief Collection is there any impact at all on backwards compatible titles with that model? I know these games all run in software, but the slightly enhanced hardware should hold some benefit when running backwards compatible titles... right?
Playing Halo 4 on the Xbox One platform in general isn't too much different with the exception everything looks and sounds better because of the obvious upgrade from a 360 to a One. Frame rates come and go above the lock rate and there's still a ton of lag even with the best connections (might have been fixed since then, it's been months for me), but personally, MCC is a good investment. All 5 of the starter Halo's, 2 of which were remastered, one of which was offered as a 'we're sorry everything fell a part' gift back during launch year, and they run great (Halo 2: Anniversary has a few hiccups, but it's not too bad). The most it ever cost was $25, for 5 games. Not a bad price considering each one individually would have cost you $60, running you $300. You can probably even find some places selling them for about $15 now.
tuhin94 wrote:
Besides HDR, the most I’ve heard the One S do better than the OG One (what a name, huh?) is provide 1-2 fps more for Xbox One games. For instance, Project Cars has an unlocked frame rate and it’s very inconsistent on OG One, bouncing around from like 30 all the way up (on rare occasions) 60 fps. The One S shows similar performance, but tests showed it was able to deliver a few more frames here and there. It’s nothing significant that is noticeable without testing equipment and analysis.

For a BC game like Halo 4 which, as far as I’m aware, does not push the Xbox One to its limits to run it optimally, the One S won’t run it any better. The crashes you guys experienced on that level were likely emulator issues that might have been ironed out in an update.

Speaking personally, I’ve played all the games on Xbox One at some point or another after they became backwards compatible and playing on Xbox One is far and away the best way to experience those games. The perfomace advantage and platform features make it a joy. While I understand your hesitation to buy MCC, I think you might have a change of heart if you spend a bit of time with it if you haven’t already. Save for the cool menus from the originals, it’s hard to play them after experiencing MCC.
I can always count on you to deliver clear, to-the-point answers huh? Thanks for the information.

As for Halo: The Master Chief Collection, I unfortunately have a long history with it dating back to its release. While I didn't own an Xbox One in that time, I did experience the game (crashes, save corruptions, black screens, hit detection issues, everything) along with 343i's attempts at sweeping it under the rug only to later literally admit incompetence. I've played the game post-patch recently, but I've seen the patch notes and the fact that there are still crashing issues (among other smaller issues) four years after release is inexcusable and I'm not willing to restart my progress on the original titles to start over in this collection.
So I don't own an Xbox One, but a friend of mine does. On his fat model Xbox One we were attempting a Halo 4 Legendary coop playthrough, but every time we attempted to load up the mission Infinity (even weeks later) the game would simply freeze and crash which pushed us to move over to Halo: The Master Chief Collection and start over from scratch there. As I have an Xbox One S on the way and have little interest in Halo: The Master Chief Collection is there any impact at all on backwards compatible titles with that model? I know these games all run in software, but the slightly enhanced hardware should hold some benefit when running backwards compatible titles... right?
Playing Halo 4 on the Xbox One platform in general isn't too much different with the exception everything looks and sounds better because of the obvious upgrade from a 360 to a One. Frame rates come and go above the lock rate and there's still a ton of lag even with the best connections (might have been fixed since then, it's been months for me), but personally, MCC is a good investment. All 5 of the starter Halo's, 2 of which were remastered, one of which was offered as a 'we're sorry everything fell a part' gift back during launch year, and they run great (Halo 2: Anniversary has a few hiccups, but it's not too bad). The most it ever cost was $25, for 5 games. Not a bad price considering each one individually would have cost you $60, running you $300. You can probably even find some places selling them for about $15 now.
Recent patch notes reveal a laundry list of bugs (including crashing) along with YouTubers like Generalkidd being able to pump out nearly twenty minute videos showcasing new bugs. It's been four years since this game released, five since the Xbox One released, and there's a next-gen Xbox on the way. What happens after that Xbox releases? Do updates just stop and the game's left with a bunch of bugs? It's been four years of "they're fixing it" so how many more years must pass?

I'm not as forgiving as most when it comes to broken products.
So I don't own an Xbox One, but a friend of mine does. On his fat model Xbox One we were attempting a Halo 4 Legendary coop playthrough, but every time we attempted to load up the mission Infinity (even weeks later) the game would simply freeze and crash which pushed us to move over to Halo: The Master Chief Collection and start over from scratch there. As I have an Xbox One S on the way and have little interest in Halo: The Master Chief Collection is there any impact at all on backwards compatible titles with that model? I know these games all run in software, but the slightly enhanced hardware should hold some benefit when running backwards compatible titles... right?
Playing Halo 4 on the Xbox One platform in general isn't too much different with the exception everything looks and sounds better because of the obvious upgrade from a 360 to a One. Frame rates come and go above the lock rate and there's still a ton of lag even with the best connections (might have been fixed since then, it's been months for me), but personally, MCC is a good investment. All 5 of the starter Halo's, 2 of which were remastered, one of which was offered as a 'we're sorry everything fell a part' gift back during launch year, and they run great (Halo 2: Anniversary has a few hiccups, but it's not too bad). The most it ever cost was $25, for 5 games. Not a bad price considering each one individually would have cost you $60, running you $300. You can probably even find some places selling them for about $15 now.
Recent patch notes reveal a laundry list of bugs (including crashing) along with YouTubers like Generalkidd being able to pump out nearly twenty minute videos showcasing new bugs. It's been four years since this game released, five since the Xbox One released, and there's a next-gen Xbox on the way. What happens after that Xbox releases? Do updates just stop and the game's left with a bunch of bugs? It's been four years of "they're fixing it" so how many more years must pass?

I'm not as forgiving as most when it comes to broken products.
Already? Feels just like yesterday I was unboxing my Xbox One. I never even upgraded to the X or S model, I just got the year one chonker model. But I'd guess they'll continue to update it until the original Xbox One servers become obsolete several years down the road.
So I don't own an Xbox One, but a friend of mine does. On his fat model Xbox One we were attempting a Halo 4 Legendary coop playthrough, but every time we attempted to load up the mission Infinity (even weeks later) the game would simply freeze and crash which pushed us to move over to Halo: The Master Chief Collection and start over from scratch there. As I have an Xbox One S on the way and have little interest in Halo: The Master Chief Collection is there any impact at all on backwards compatible titles with that model? I know these games all run in software, but the slightly enhanced hardware should hold some benefit when running backwards compatible titles... right?
Playing Halo 4 on the Xbox One platform in general isn't too much different with the exception everything looks and sounds better because of the obvious upgrade from a 360 to a One. Frame rates come and go above the lock rate and there's still a ton of lag even with the best connections (might have been fixed since then, it's been months for me), but personally, MCC is a good investment. All 5 of the starter Halo's, 2 of which were remastered, one of which was offered as a 'we're sorry everything fell a part' gift back during launch year, and they run great (Halo 2: Anniversary has a few hiccups, but it's not too bad). The most it ever cost was $25, for 5 games. Not a bad price considering each one individually would have cost you $60, running you $300. You can probably even find some places selling them for about $15 now.
Recent patch notes reveal a laundry list of bugs (including crashing) along with YouTubers like Generalkidd being able to pump out nearly twenty minute videos showcasing new bugs. It's been four years since this game released, five since the Xbox One released, and there's a next-gen Xbox on the way. What happens after that Xbox releases? Do updates just stop and the game's left with a bunch of bugs? It's been four years of "they're fixing it" so how many more years must pass?

I'm not as forgiving as most when it comes to broken products.
Already? Feels just like yesterday I was unboxing my Xbox One. I never even upgraded to the X or S model, I just got the year one chonker model. But I'd guess they'll continue to update it until the original Xbox One servers become obsolete several years down the road.
The game's needed patches for almost an entire console generation with no sign of it ever truly being fixed.

I think you can see why I don't like the game very much.
tuhin94 wrote:
Besides HDR, the most I’ve heard the One S do better than the OG One (what a name, huh?) is provide 1-2 fps more for Xbox One games. For instance, Project Cars has an unlocked frame rate and it’s very inconsistent on OG One, bouncing around from like 30 all the way up (on rare occasions) 60 fps. The One S shows similar performance, but tests showed it was able to deliver a few more frames here and there. It’s nothing significant that is noticeable without testing equipment and analysis.

For a BC game like Halo 4 which, as far as I’m aware, does not push the Xbox One to its limits to run it optimally, the One S won’t run it any better. The crashes you guys experienced on that level were likely emulator issues that might have been ironed out in an update.

Speaking personally, I’ve played all the games on Xbox One at some point or another after they became backwards compatible and playing on Xbox One is far and away the best way to experience those games. The perfomace advantage and platform features make it a joy. While I understand your hesitation to buy MCC, I think you might have a change of heart if you spend a bit of time with it if you haven’t already. Save for the cool menus from the originals, it’s hard to play them after experiencing MCC.
I can always count on you to deliver clear, to-the-point answers huh? Thanks for the information.

As for Halo: The Master Chief Collection, I unfortunately have a long history with it dating back to its release. While I didn't own an Xbox One in that time, I did experience the game (crashes, save corruptions, black screens, hit detection issues, everything) along with 343i's attempts at sweeping it under the rug only to later literally admit incompetence. I've played the game post-patch recently, but I've seen the patch notes and the fact that there are still crashing issues (among other smaller issues) four years after release is inexcusable and I'm not willing to restart my progress on the original titles to start over in this collection.
You’re welcome :-) Yeah, I totally see your reasoning with MCC. If I can make one last case for MCC, the game does feel complete. I’m pretty unforgiving when it comes to broken games as well, but now it’s in a state where it feels like a high-quality product. It truly does feel like the old days of Halo brought up to current standards. No question, there are still a number of issues but they are not major. Not that bugs are okay, don’t get me wrong, but the ones remaining are things that are understandable for a project of this size. I hope I got my point across there. I don’t mean to suggest what 343i did at launch was okay, but, going forward, new MCC is a great experience and I’m solely commending them on the new version. Again, I totally get why a lot of players don’t want to play it and it’s completely understandable. 343i did say that new MCC will be a work in progress so waiting until everything is ironed out is a good way to go for many.

Regardless, the BC versions are terrific. I like the individual armories, stats, and menus for sure.
tuhin94 wrote:
Besides HDR, the most I’ve heard the One S do better than the OG One (what a name, huh?) is provide 1-2 fps more for Xbox One games. For instance, Project Cars has an unlocked frame rate and it’s very inconsistent on OG One, bouncing around from like 30 all the way up (on rare occasions) 60 fps. The One S shows similar performance, but tests showed it was able to deliver a few more frames here and there. It’s nothing significant that is noticeable without testing equipment and analysis.

For a BC game like Halo 4 which, as far as I’m aware, does not push the Xbox One to its limits to run it optimally, the One S won’t run it any better. The crashes you guys experienced on that level were likely emulator issues that might have been ironed out in an update.

Speaking personally, I’ve played all the games on Xbox One at some point or another after they became backwards compatible and playing on Xbox One is far and away the best way to experience those games. The perfomace advantage and platform features make it a joy. While I understand your hesitation to buy MCC, I think you might have a change of heart if you spend a bit of time with it if you haven’t already. Save for the cool menus from the originals, it’s hard to play them after experiencing MCC.
I can always count on you to deliver clear, to-the-point answers huh? Thanks for the information.

As for Halo: The Master Chief Collection, I unfortunately have a long history with it dating back to its release. While I didn't own an Xbox One in that time, I did experience the game (crashes, save corruptions, black screens, hit detection issues, everything) along with 343i's attempts at sweeping it under the rug only to later literally admit incompetence. I've played the game post-patch recently, but I've seen the patch notes and the fact that there are still crashing issues (among other smaller issues) four years after release is inexcusable and I'm not willing to restart my progress on the original titles to start over in this collection.
It's not like they were just sweeping it under the rug, it's more that they had other priorities. It wasn't their intention to make a collection in the first place. It was a simple remaster, like Halo CEA, but Microsoft wanted to turn it into a collection, resulting in what we got. The priorities I was talking about were Halo 5 and the Slipspace Engine. We all know that Halo 5 received some 10 content updates, which made Halo 5 a completely different game compared to it's release with hundreds more armor pieces, more maps, skins, assassinations, gamemodes and so on. However, at this point in time, where both Halo 5 and the Engine are complete, they can dedicate a team to fixing MCC while the rest focuses on the next title. The thing about MCC is that for every issue they fix, it seems that dozens more take it's place.
So far, I haven't really encountered any issue... actually, ANY major issue in MCC, at least in the "unplayable" levels. The game runs mostly flawlessly for me. The only issues I encountered are in my XboxDVR. Another issue I had were ghost bullets, but it seems it was fixed now. I'm either the luckiest -Yoink- since Chief or I- I just don't know. For now, all we can do is wait
tuhin94 wrote:
Besides HDR, the most I’ve heard the One S do better than the OG One (what a name, huh?) is provide 1-2 fps more for Xbox One games. For instance, Project Cars has an unlocked frame rate and it’s very inconsistent on OG One, bouncing around from like 30 all the way up (on rare occasions) 60 fps. The One S shows similar performance, but tests showed it was able to deliver a few more frames here and there. It’s nothing significant that is noticeable without testing equipment and analysis.

For a BC game like Halo 4 which, as far as I’m aware, does not push the Xbox One to its limits to run it optimally, the One S won’t run it any better. The crashes you guys experienced on that level were likely emulator issues that might have been ironed out in an update.

Speaking personally, I’ve played all the games on Xbox One at some point or another after they became backwards compatible and playing on Xbox One is far and away the best way to experience those games. The perfomace advantage and platform features make it a joy. While I understand your hesitation to buy MCC, I think you might have a change of heart if you spend a bit of time with it if you haven’t already. Save for the cool menus from the originals, it’s hard to play them after experiencing MCC.
I can always count on you to deliver clear, to-the-point answers huh? Thanks for the information.

As for Halo: The Master Chief Collection, I unfortunately have a long history with it dating back to its release. While I didn't own an Xbox One in that time, I did experience the game (crashes, save corruptions, black screens, hit detection issues, everything) along with 343i's attempts at sweeping it under the rug only to later literally admit incompetence. I've played the game post-patch recently, but I've seen the patch notes and the fact that there are still crashing issues (among other smaller issues) four years after release is inexcusable and I'm not willing to restart my progress on the original titles to start over in this collection.
It's not like they were just sweeping it under the rug, it's more that they had other priorities. It wasn't their intention to make a collection in the first place. It was a simple remaster, like Halo CEA, but Microsoft wanted to turn it into a collection, resulting in what we got. The priorities I was talking about were Halo 5 and the Slipspace Engine. We all know that Halo 5 received some 10 content updates, which made Halo 5 a completely different game compared to it's release with hundreds more armor pieces, more maps, skins, assassinations, gamemodes and so on. However, at this point in time, where both Halo 5 and the Engine are complete, they can dedicate a team to fixing MCC while the rest focuses on the next title. The thing about MCC is that for every issue they fix, it seems that dozens more take it's place.
So far, I haven't really encountered any issue... actually, ANY major issue in MCC, at least in the "unplayable" levels. The game runs mostly flawlessly for me. The only issues I encountered are in my XboxDVR. Another issue I had were ghost bullets, but it seems it was fixed now. I'm either the luckiest -Yoink- since Chief or I- I just don't know. For now, all we can do is wait
From 2014 until (I believe) 2016 all people got from 343i were vague community updates and silent patches. Frank O'Connor eventually admitted the incompetence of 343i (literally) while going into detail about what went wrong with Halo: The Master Chief Collection, but at the end of the day there was still at least a year between the game releasing and 343i openly discussing what went wrong.

And it's been four years of "all we can do is wait" so please stop apologizing for 343i as that's the reason we're here to begin with. If people stopped bending over for these corporations then games would actually release finished instead of being broken, being fixed with digital patches, and then all of those patches being erased from existence as soon as the console stops being supported.
tuhin94 wrote:
Besides HDR, the most I’ve heard the One S do better than the OG One (what a name, huh?) is provide 1-2 fps more for Xbox One games. For instance, Project Cars has an unlocked frame rate and it’s very inconsistent on OG One, bouncing around from like 30 all the way up (on rare occasions) 60 fps. The One S shows similar performance, but tests showed it was able to deliver a few more frames here and there. It’s nothing significant that is noticeable without testing equipment and analysis.

For a BC game like Halo 4 which, as far as I’m aware, does not push the Xbox One to its limits to run it optimally, the One S won’t run it any better. The crashes you guys experienced on that level were likely emulator issues that might have been ironed out in an update.

Speaking personally, I’ve played all the games on Xbox One at some point or another after they became backwards compatible and playing on Xbox One is far and away the best way to experience those games. The perfomace advantage and platform features make it a joy. While I understand your hesitation to buy MCC, I think you might have a change of heart if you spend a bit of time with it if you haven’t already. Save for the cool menus from the originals, it’s hard to play them after experiencing MCC.
It's not like they were just sweeping it under the rug, it's more that they had other priorities. It wasn't their intention to make a collection in the first place. It was a simple remaster, like Halo CEA, but Microsoft wanted to turn it into a collection, resulting in what we got. The priorities I was talking about were Halo 5 and the Slipspace Engine. We all know that Halo 5 received some 10 content updates, which made Halo 5 a completely different game compared to it's release with hundreds more armor pieces, more maps, skins, assassinations, gamemodes and so on. However, at this point in time, where both Halo 5 and the Engine are complete, they can dedicate a team to fixing MCC while the rest focuses on the next title. The thing about MCC is that for every issue they fix, it seems that dozens more take it's place.
So far, I haven't really encountered any issue... actually, ANY major issue in MCC, at least in the "unplayable" levels. The game runs mostly flawlessly for me. The only issues I encountered are in my XboxDVR. Another issue I had were ghost bullets, but it seems it was fixed now. I'm either the luckiest -Yoink- since Chief or I- I just don't know. For now, all we can do is wait
From 2014 until (I believe) 2016 all people got from 343i were vague community updates and silent patches. Frank O'Connor eventually admitted the incompetence of 343i (literally) while going into detail about what went wrong with Halo: The Master Chief Collection, but at the end of the day there was still at least a year between the game releasing and 343i openly discussing what went wrong.

And it's been four years of "all we can do is wait" so please stop apologizing for 343i as that's the reason we're here to begin with. If people stopped bending over for these corporations then games would actually release finished instead of being broken, being fixed with digital patches, and then all of those patches being erased from existence as soon as the console stops being supported.
The fact still stands. There wasn't supposed to be a Master Chief Collection in the first place. It was supposed to be a simple Halo 2 Anniversary. It's not their fault the plans suddenly changed.
Yet, 3 years after their discussion is when they started fixing it. It just means there were other priorities in the moment. A game, it's updates and an engine.
tuhin94 wrote:
Besides HDR, the most I’ve heard the One S do better than the OG One (what a name, huh?) is provide 1-2 fps more for Xbox One games. For instance, Project Cars has an unlocked frame rate and it’s very inconsistent on OG One, bouncing around from like 30 all the way up (on rare occasions) 60 fps. The One S shows similar performance, but tests showed it was able to deliver a few more frames here and there. It’s nothing significant that is noticeable without testing equipment and analysis.

For a BC game like Halo 4 which, as far as I’m aware, does not push the Xbox One to its limits to run it optimally, the One S won’t run it any better. The crashes you guys experienced on that level were likely emulator issues that might have been ironed out in an update.

Speaking personally, I’ve played all the games on Xbox One at some point or another after they became backwards compatible and playing on Xbox One is far and away the best way to experience those games. The perfomace advantage and platform features make it a joy. While I understand your hesitation to buy MCC, I think you might have a change of heart if you spend a bit of time with it if you haven’t already. Save for the cool menus from the originals, it’s hard to play them after experiencing MCC.
It's not like they were just sweeping it under the rug, it's more that they had other priorities. It wasn't their intention to make a collection in the first place. It was a simple remaster, like Halo CEA, but Microsoft wanted to turn it into a collection, resulting in what we got. The priorities I was talking about were Halo 5 and the Slipspace Engine. We all know that Halo 5 received some 10 content updates, which made Halo 5 a completely different game compared to it's release with hundreds more armor pieces, more maps, skins, assassinations, gamemodes and so on. However, at this point in time, where both Halo 5 and the Engine are complete, they can dedicate a team to fixing MCC while the rest focuses on the next title. The thing about MCC is that for every issue they fix, it seems that dozens more take it's place.
So far, I haven't really encountered any issue... actually, ANY major issue in MCC, at least in the "unplayable" levels. The game runs mostly flawlessly for me. The only issues I encountered are in my XboxDVR. Another issue I had were ghost bullets, but it seems it was fixed now. I'm either the luckiest -Yoink- since Chief or I- I just don't know. For now, all we can do is wait
From 2014 until (I believe) 2016 all people got from 343i were vague community updates and silent patches. Frank O'Connor eventually admitted the incompetence of 343i (literally) while going into detail about what went wrong with Halo: The Master Chief Collection, but at the end of the day there was still at least a year between the game releasing and 343i openly discussing what went wrong.

And it's been four years of "all we can do is wait" so please stop apologizing for 343i as that's the reason we're here to begin with. If people stopped bending over for these corporations then games would actually release finished instead of being broken, being fixed with digital patches, and then all of those patches being erased from existence as soon as the console stops being supported.
The fact still stands. There wasn't supposed to be a Master Chief Collection in the first place. It was supposed to be a simple Halo 2 Anniversary. It's not their fault the plans suddenly changed.
Yet, 3 years after their discussion is when they started fixing it. It just means there were other priorities in the moment. A game, it's updates and an engine.
Hey, is it cool if I sell you a car? The windows don't work, the doors don't quite lock right, and it frequently stalls, but I didn't really want to sell it to begin with and I'll fix it a few years down the line.
tuhin94 wrote:
Besides HDR, the most I’ve heard the One S do better than the OG One (what a name, huh?) is provide 1-2 fps more for Xbox One games. For instance, Project Cars has an unlocked frame rate and it’s very inconsistent on OG One, bouncing around from like 30 all the way up (on rare occasions) 60 fps. The One S shows similar performance, but tests showed it was able to deliver a few more frames here and there. It’s nothing significant that is noticeable without testing equipment and analysis.

For a BC game like Halo 4 which, as far as I’m aware, does not push the Xbox One to its limits to run it optimally, the One S won’t run it any better. The crashes you guys experienced on that level were likely emulator issues that might have been ironed out in an update.

Speaking personally, I’ve played all the games on Xbox One at some point or another after they became backwards compatible and playing on Xbox One is far and away the best way to experience those games. The perfomace advantage and platform features make it a joy. While I understand your hesitation to buy MCC, I think you might have a change of heart if you spend a bit of time with it if you haven’t already. Save for the cool menus from the originals, it’s hard to play them after experiencing MCC.
It's not like they were just sweeping it under the rug, it's more that they had other priorities. It wasn't their intention to make a collection in the first place. It was a simple remaster, like Halo CEA, but Microsoft wanted to turn it into a collection, resulting in what we got. The priorities I was talking about were Halo 5 and the Slipspace Engine. We all know that Halo 5 received some 10 content updates, which made Halo 5 a completely different game compared to it's release with hundreds more armor pieces, more maps, skins, assassinations, gamemodes and so on. However, at this point in time, where both Halo 5 and the Engine are complete, they can dedicate a team to fixing MCC while the rest focuses on the next title. The thing about MCC is that for every issue they fix, it seems that dozens more take it's place.
So far, I haven't really encountered any issue... actually, ANY major issue in MCC, at least in the "unplayable" levels. The game runs mostly flawlessly for me. The only issues I encountered are in my XboxDVR. Another issue I had were ghost bullets, but it seems it was fixed now. I'm either the luckiest -Yoink- since Chief or I- I just don't know. For now, all we can do is wait
The fact still stands. There wasn't supposed to be a Master Chief Collection in the first place. It was supposed to be a simple Halo 2 Anniversary. It's not their fault the plans suddenly changed.
Yet, 3 years after their discussion is when they started fixing it. It just means there were other priorities in the moment. A game, it's updates and an engine.
Hey, is it cool if I sell you a car? The windows don't work, the doors don't quite lock right, and it frequently stalls, but I didn't really want to sell it to begin with and I'll fix it a few years down the line.
I wanted this perfectly fine car, but I got this broken truck instead. The corp behind just decided it was better to give me a truck instead of a car. Came without windows, some tires and such. They told me they were building a completely new one but something must have happened to come in such a garbage condition. Have they got stuck to the car I ordered none of this would happen. They even refuse to fix it because of some other priorities they said they did. I was told they were making a new model and a new engine to go with it and had no time to fix it. Barnacles.