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Covenant plasma physics

OP M0ckingDrag0n

Covenant ships can fire plasma at the speed of light. How does that make sense? I thought you need an infinite amount of energy to accelerate something with mass and plasma does contain atoms which have mass.
Wait they can? I was unaware of that ability. Where did you find that info? If you're referring to the Energy Projector, that only travels at close to the speed of light, but does not reach that speed completely.

Also, I don't think you need an infinite amount of energy to propel something at the speed of light. It comes down to the E=MC^2 equation. So the amount of mass to be moved will increase the amount of energy needed, but it won't be an infinite amount of energy unless there is an infinite amount of mass being moved.
Wait they can? I was unaware of that ability. Where did you find that info? If you're referring to the Energy Projector, that only travels at close to the speed of light, but does not reach that speed completely.

Also, I don't think you need an infinite amount of energy to propel something at the speed of light. It comes down to the E=MC^2 equation. So the amount of mass to be moved will increase the amount of energy needed, but it won't be an infinite amount of energy unless there is an infinite amount of mass being moved.
Maybe I read it wrong or the info there is wrong but it's what I'm getting from Halopedia. The laws of physics states that if you try to accelerate something with mass at the speed of light, it's mass becomes infinite and so does the energy required to move it.
I believe Halo: First strike somewhat explains how Plasma is shot, and if I remember correctly it uses a form of magnetic field to shape and launch the plasma... as for the energy required, the Covenant ships have enough to fire the projector once in a while, but the regular plasma can be fired much more rapidly.

In First Strike it is revealed Cortana found a way to fire regular plasma as energy projectors, but the sustained fire either melted the guns or used too much energy. They also found you could use UNSC MAC cannons to fire plasma, but it had an EMP effect burning out most electronics on the Gettysburg.
I believe Halo: First strike somewhat explains how Plasma is shot, and if I remember correctly it uses a form of magnetic field to shape and launch the plasma... as for the energy required, the Covenant ships have enough to fire the projector once in a while, but the regular plasma can be fired much more rapidly.

In First Strike it is revealed Cortana found a way to fire regular plasma as energy projectors, but the sustained fire either melted the guns or used too much energy. They also found you could use UNSC MAC cannons to fire plasma, but it had an EMP effect burning out most electronics on the Gettysburg.
Do they explain how it's fired at the speed of light?
I believe Halo: First strike somewhat explains how Plasma is shot, and if I remember correctly it uses a form of magnetic field to shape and launch the plasma... as for the energy required, the Covenant ships have enough to fire the projector once in a while, but the regular plasma can be fired much more rapidly.

In First Strike it is revealed Cortana found a way to fire regular plasma as energy projectors, but the sustained fire either melted the guns or used too much energy. They also found you could use UNSC MAC cannons to fire plasma, but it had an EMP effect burning out most electronics on the Gettysburg.
Do they explain how it's fired at the speed of light?
Unfortunately not. The regular plasma on Covenant ships do not travel at the speed of light, and in the books they often detail How ship captains dodged plasma shots. The projector is different, in Halo: Fall of Reach it describes the projector as a blink and you’ll miss it cutting strike (they let it run until it cuts through an entire UNSC ship), that lasts about ten-ish seconds. It has a greater range than regular plasma and that’s about all the lore on it
I believe Halo: First strike somewhat explains how Plasma is shot, and if I remember correctly it uses a form of magnetic field to shape and launch the plasma... as for the energy required, the Covenant ships have enough to fire the projector once in a while, but the regular plasma can be fired much more rapidly.

In First Strike it is revealed Cortana found a way to fire regular plasma as energy projectors, but the sustained fire either melted the guns or used too much energy. They also found you could use UNSC MAC cannons to fire plasma, but it had an EMP effect burning out most electronics on the Gettysburg.
Do they explain how it's fired at the speed of light?
Unfortunately not. The regular plasma on Covenant ships do not travel at the speed of light, and in the books they often detail How ship captains dodged plasma shots. The projector is different, in Halo: Fall of Reach it describes the projector as a blink and you’ll miss it cutting strike (they let it run until it cuts through an entire UNSC ship), that lasts about ten-ish seconds. It has a greater range than regular plasma and that’s about all the lore on it
Someone should change the info on Halopedia then because it states the energy projector fires plasma and that it can travel the speed of light.
Covenant ships can fire plasma at the speed of light. How does that make sense? I thought you need an infinite amount of energy to accelerate something with mass and plasma does contain atoms which have mass.
Under 200,000km is considered extreme range for Covenant Starships as of the updated First Strike edition. It is highly unlikely that they can concentrate blasts of plasma to C or even C/2 without significant lensing that might only be seen in the Covenant's dedicated sniper ship.
Wait they can? I was unaware of that ability. Where did you find that info? If you're referring to the Energy Projector, that only travels at close to the speed of light, but does not reach that speed completely.

Also, I don't think you need an infinite amount of energy to propel something at the speed of light. It comes down to the E=MC^2 equation. So the amount of mass to be moved will increase the amount of energy needed, but it won't be an infinite amount of energy unless there is an infinite amount of mass being moved.
You need an infinite amount of energy to bring mass to the speed of light thats why photon
s can can go that fast because they don't have mass
Wait they can? I was unaware of that ability. Where did you find that info? If you're referring to the Energy Projector, that only travels at close to the speed of light, but does not reach that speed completely.

Also, I don't think you need an infinite amount of energy to propel something at the speed of light. It comes down to the E=MC^2 equation. So the amount of mass to be moved will increase the amount of energy needed, but it won't be an infinite amount of energy unless there is an infinite amount of mass being moved.
Mass increases as velocity increases. There are well established laws of physics you can look up, thousands of sources, that explain why it takes an infinite amount of energy to move anything that has mass to the speed of light. The Universe does not like anything breaking that constant. From time dilation, to your mass increasing, there are several mechanisms that present you from reaching C. Mass and Energy are two sides of the same coin. The more mass you have, the more energy you have. The greater the amount of energy, the greater the mass. Since you need energy to move mass, and since increasing an objects velocity increases its energy, and therefore its mass, you would then need even MORE energy to accelerate that mass, thus increasing the energy, and increasing the mass, and now you have a snowball effect. Time dilation prevents you, in your reference to move at the speed of light. The faster you move through space, the slower your clock runs. We see this with high orbiting GPS satellites that need to keep extremely accurate time, unless you want to be 4 miles off each refresh cycle, which you would be if they did not correct for the time difference on their onboard clocks, to the clocks on the ground, and they are only moving at 17,000mph. Since speed is a measurement of distance over time, and your clock slows down the faster you move, you will not reach C in your frame of reference. If you were moving, say, 99.999999999999% the speed of light, 24 hours for you would have passed, but when you stop, you will be 19,380 years in the future. Remove one of those 9's(11 instead of 12) and you would only have gone 6125 years in the future. You can also observe this with a very accurate speedometer: when you are traveling at 65mph you are ever so slightly only traveling at 64.999999.........mph due to the fact that the Universe does not want you to reach C. Your clock is slowed down, so you are only going 64.999999...........mph. You still can't reach 100%C to an observers frame of reference because since your mass is increasing due the amount of energy you are putting into the system, you will never be able to put enough energy into the system to reach C because you would need an infinite amount of energy to accelerate you to C.

An energy projector, shooting highly charged particles, can be accelerated easily near C because of the low mass of the particles, but upon impact will have tremendous kinetic energy due to their velocity. I'm sure you know the dangers grains of sand can have on the space shuttle in orbit because of how fast they are moving.