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Glasslands, is it worth it?

OP CantonBrowncoat

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I have heard from many sources that although glasslands is a halo novel, karen traviss just does not have a firm grasp on how to successfully handle it? to make a long story short, is it worth a purchase?
IMO, it is very worth it. Not everyone hated it and just because those who did hate it are more verbal doesn't mean you shouldn't read it. Don't be a follower and hate the book because someone else hates it. Read it for yourself and form your own opinion.
I'd at least give it a read. I didn't care for it though.
I get my books at my local Barnes and Noble bookstore. I take the book from the shelf and sit down in the cafe are with some triple chocolate chunk cookies (yummm...) while "previewing" the book. Thats how I usually decide if I like the book. I could spend a whole day in there... and I almost have once.

But, if you don't have that luxury... I found it pretty interesting. A little confusing at times, but mostly a good read.
Not really, it's not worthy to read because of horrid Karen Traviss's writing and seems that she never bothered to research about Halo at all.

Otherwise, just read a summary at wikipedia and you will be fine.
Does it matter if it is "worth it" or not? It expands the lore therefore you need to get it so you aren't asking stupid questions later.
i finished it earlier this week, i'd say go ahead and read it. you'll know about spartan blue team and halsey and how things kind of are going "after the war."
It's a very good book, VERY GOOD. I won't spoil it for you, but there's a certain scene with an altercation between an old hag and a female soldier. When that happened I was smiling and wanting to read more. The ending of the book just made me hungry for more.
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It's a very good book, VERY GOOD. I won't spoil it for you, but there's a certain scene with an altercation between an old hag and a female soldier. When that happened I was smiling and wanting to read more. The ending of the book just made me hungry for more.
I pretty much had to read the book either way, otherwise i would be missing out on information towards the canon.
It's a very good book. Definitely don't understand some of the hate, would recommend purchase
I really don't understand why so many people don't like it actually.

I think it has a lot to do with the fact that Halsey is not painted in a good light, but this meshes well with the rest of the fiction, IMO. It's just that no other piece of fiction has taken such a close look at her motiviations and personality before. Also, yes, Glasslands takes a critical look at it, but that's a very good thing, IMO. Considering things from different perspectives makes the universe even more fun and interesting to learn about.

I'm not sure if the reason people don't like this is because people think of the Spartans as heros and the Spartans think of Halsey as a saint. But they were raised as Spartans from as young as four years old. They don't know anything else.

This book also takes a very critical look at the ONI. Again, maybe people don't like this, I dunno.

Anyways, there are still lots of things in the Halo universe that haven't been explored very much, and more importantly from different critical points of view. For instance, the nature of the martial law imposed by the UNSC to varying degrees, the dire situation the UNSC and humanity were in by the time of Halo 3, and more.

I like Glasslands for asking questions that haven't really been asked elsewhere (and then answering some). I like that many large scale things aren't simple can't be broken down to only black and white (such as Brutes must either be with or against Elites).

Yes Glasslands is worth it.
It starts out slow but picks up. I'd pick it up if I was you....
I think it's good, expands on the universe post-War, introduces some new interesting characters and events. I would recommend it.
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I think it has a lot to do with the fact that Halsey is not painted in a good light, but this meshes well with the rest of the fiction, IMO. It's just that no other piece of fiction has taken such a close look at her motiviations and personality before.
Except First Strike. And Ghosts of Onyx. And her Journal.

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Also, yes, Glasslands takes a critical look at it, but that's a very good thing, IMO. Considering things from different perspectives makes the universe even more fun and interesting to learn about.
If by critical you mean overwhelmingly biased against her, the yes it is critical. Why does Mendez hate her? Oh, because she had stricter genetic markers on the S-IIs. Why does Parandosky hate her? Oh because Halsey made 75 clones of the S-IIs to give to their families as closure and to make her feel better AND Maggie didn't know about it despite being the head of ONI and somehow keeping tabs on everyone else to the point she can have anyone killed.

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I'm not sure if the reason people don't like this is because people think of the Spartans as heros and the Spartans think of Halsey as a saint. But they were raised as Spartans from as young as four years old. They don't know anything else.
Oh I think of them as heroes, but even at a young age they understood what was going on. In her Journal, one of them asks if they are there to "stop everyone from killing each other." Yes the training was brutal. Yes the augmentations killed and maimed quite a few candidates. Yes the Spartan-IIs were very effective ta stopping a rebel movement that at this point NUKED a colony with a nuke made for breaking asteroids, hijacked UNSC ships and murdered the entire crews, bombed public places killing many innocents for at times a single UNSC or CMA trooper. And unchecked, all projections showed humanity entering a new Dark Age.

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This book also takes a very critical look at the ONI. Again, maybe people don't like this, I dunno.
You mean ONI being completely evil? Nothing new there.

One more thing, the black and white comment regarding the Brutes is also an issue. I'm under no impression the Brutes all believe the same thing, but this new relationship is completely unrealistic. Every piece of canon has showed the Elites and Brutes never got along, even a Prophet called them savages in the short story "Wages of Sin". They are a pack based species and each pack has varying views on the Covenant faith, grooming habits and general barbarity. And even if some Brutes respect the Elites, the Brutes still murdered the Elite High Council, ATE the recently murdered corpses of the Elites, murdered every Elite in New Mombasa and Elite and Brutes ships battled each other all across the Covenant fleets.

Yet from the perspective of the major Elite characters we follow from Jul to 'Telcam, that's all forgivable, yet humanity are such a vile race for the vaguest of reasons. Where is the black and white in that?
I wish i could thank that post a dozen times over
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I think it has a lot to do with the fact that Halsey is not painted in a good light, but this meshes well with the rest of the fiction, IMO. It's just that no other piece of fiction has taken such a close look at her motiviations and personality before.
Except First Strike. And Ghosts of Onyx. And her Journal.
All of which look at her from her own point of view, and the point of view of her Spartans, both of whom are going to have a bias toward forgiveness.

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Also, yes, Glasslands takes a critical look at it, but that's a very good thing, IMO. Considering things from different perspectives makes the universe even more fun and interesting to learn about.
If by critical you mean overwhelmingly biased against her, the yes it is critical. Why does Mendez hate her? Oh, because she had stricter genetic markers on the S-IIs. Why does Parandosky hate her? Oh because Halsey made 75 clones of the S-IIs to give to their families as closure and to make her feel better AND Maggie didn't know about it despite being the head of ONI and somehow keeping tabs on everyone else to the point she can have anyone killed.
Halsey and Mendez always had tension over the morals of the program. Without anything to distract them, they began to fight about who was worse. It happens.

The clones were one thing, but throughout her entire tenure with ONI, Halsey acted like she was top dog, and for a time, Parangosky couldn't do anything about it. She needed Halsey, and Halsey had powerful friends. With Halsey officially dead, and anyone who knows the truth loyal to Parangosky or Osman, Maggie could bring Halsey down a notch.

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This book also takes a very critical look at the ONI. Again, maybe people don't like this, I dunno.
You mean ONI being completely evil? Nothing new there.

One more thing, the black and white comment regarding the Brutes is also an issue. I'm under no impression the Brutes all believe the same thing, but this new relationship is completely unrealistic. Every piece of canon has showed the Elites and Brutes never got along, even a Prophet called them savages in the short story "Wages of Sin". They are a pack based species and each pack has varying views on the Covenant faith, grooming habits and general barbarity. And even if some Brutes respect the Elites, the Brutes still murdered the Elite High Council, ATE the recently murdered corpses of the Elites, murdered every Elite in New Mombasa and Elite and Brutes ships battled each other all across the Covenant fleets.

Yet from the perspective of the major Elite characters we follow from Jul to 'Telcam, that's all forgivable, yet humanity are such a vile race for the vaguest of reasons. Where is the black and white in that?
[/quote]The book only gives us a look at one side of the argument, the side that wants to attack humanity. There are other perspectives that exist, we know, and Glasslands gave us a new perspective. Glasslands is entirely shades of grey, with very few "black and white" point of views.

OT: OP, I would highly recommend Glasslands. I read the thing in one day, the only Halo book I have ever done that with. It's a great look at post-war politics, and an excellent read.
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All of which look at her from her own point of view, and the point of view of her Spartans, both of whom are going to have a bias toward forgiveness.
And even then she wasn't entirely happy with herself. Just looking at the Journal alone shows this, everything else is icing on the cake.

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Halsey and Mendez always had tension over the morals of the program. Without anything to distract them, they began to fight about who was worse. It happens.
And yet Mendez would let Halsey starve if it came down to it? He has no problem letting this run through his mind.

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The clones were one thing, but throughout her entire tenure with ONI, Halsey acted like she was top dog, and for a time, Parangosky couldn't do anything about it. She needed Halsey, and Halsey had powerful friends. With Halsey officially dead, and anyone who knows the truth loyal to Parangosky or Osman, Maggie could bring Halsey down a notch.
By threatening her with the death penalty. Right.

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The book only gives us a look at one side of the argument, the side that wants to attack humanity. There are other perspectives that exist, we know, and Glasslands gave us a new perspective. Glasslands is entirely shades of grey, with very few "black and white" point of views.
So may I ask WHERE those perspectives are? Even the anti-human sentiment in in the meeting of the Kaidons was overwhelming. Where was the growing Elite human sympathizer movement? It exists and yet Phillips was completely ignorant of it despite being an expert on everything else.
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I really don't understand why so many people don't like it actually.

It's personal preference and that's perfectly fine.

What chaps my hide is how they claim that she IS such a terrible writer and blah blah blah.

She apparently gets work. I'd like to think the average reader/gamer/etc doesn't know jack until they've accomplished what the author/dev has.

Each of their statements could easily be fixed with the addition of the words "...To Me."

YOU don't like it. Some others don't like it. Apparently Bungie/343/MS whoever HIRED HER likes it so your say means very little.

I honestly preferred Nylunds writing but I enjoyed the reality and honesty coming out from Mendez and Halsey.

A great line from The Avengers hits me when Stark orders Cap to follow Black Panther. He hesitates but then just "Yes, Sir's!" him. Stark questions this at first when Henry Pym points out "He's a soldier. He follows orders. Even the bad ones." That's how I view Mendez. He took part in the Spartan III program KNOWING it didn't sit well with him. But he's a soldier. You point, he shoots.
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All of which look at her from her own point of view, and the point of view of her Spartans, both of whom are going to have a bias toward forgiveness.
And even then she wasn't entirely happy with herself. Just looking at the Journal alone shows this, everything else is icing on the cake.
All that does is paint Halsey as sympathetic. We get "I did horrible stuff, but I feel guilty", and the way it's presented makes the reader sympathize with Halsey. Glasslands gives us the facts without the benefit of Halsey's guilt, painting her as a darker character.

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Halsey and Mendez always had tension over the morals of the program. Without anything to distract them, they began to fight about who was worse. It happens.
And yet Mendez would let Halsey starve if it came down to it? He has no problem letting this run through his mind.
He mentions it once. And his hate toward her is understandable. Humans tend to try and blame others before accepting blame themselves.

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The clones were one thing, but throughout her entire tenure with ONI, Halsey acted like she was top dog, and for a time, Parangosky couldn't do anything about it. She needed Halsey, and Halsey had powerful friends. With Halsey officially dead, and anyone who knows the truth loyal to Parangosky or Osman, Maggie could bring Halsey down a notch.
By threatening her with the death penalty. Right.
Like Parangosky said, no one crosses her and gets away with it.

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The book only gives us a look at one side of the argument, the side that wants to attack humanity. There are other perspectives that exist, we know, and Glasslands gave us a new perspective. Glasslands is entirely shades of grey, with very few "black and white" point of views.
So may I ask WHERE those perspectives are? Even the anti-human sentiment in in the meeting of the Kaidons was overwhelming. Where was the growing Elite human sympathizer movement? It exists and yet Phillips was completely ignorant of it despite being an expert on everything else.
The perspective wasn't presented in the book, but avid Halo lore fans know it exists. We see it all over Halo 3, and present in Conversations from the Universe.
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All that does is paint Halsey as sympathetic. We get "I did horrible stuff, but I feel guilty", and the way it's presented makes the reader sympathize with Halsey. Glasslands gives us the facts without the benefit of Halsey's guilt, painting her as a darker character.
What facts are exactly presented?

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He mentions it once. And his hate toward her is understandable. Humans tend to try and blame others before accepting blame themselves.
What exactly can he blame her for?

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Like Parangosky said, no one crosses her and gets away with it.
And so what exactly has Halsey done to Parandoksy that warrants the death penalty? Act important?

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The perspective wasn't presented in the book, but avid Halo lore fans know it exists. We see it all over Halo 3, and present in Conversations from the Universe.
Show, don't tell.
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